• WHO IS THE WOMAN IN REVELATION 12:1 AND WHAT DO THE 12 STARS ON HER HEAD MEAN?
    Bible Study / Daily Devotional
    Daily Devotions
    Average reading time is about 5 and a half minutes
    In this passage, God’s church is represented as a bride. We find support for this in Jeremiah 6:2: “I have likened the daughter of Zion to a lovely and delicate woman.” The apostle Paul also supports this picture when he writes, “I am jealous for you with godly jealousy. For I have betrothed you to one husband, that I may present you as a chaste virgin to Christ” (2 Corinthians 11:2). See also Ephesians 5:22, 23 and Revelation 19:7, 8.

    This bride is spoken of as being “clothed with the sun.” Jesus is represented by the sun in the Bible. “The Lord God is a sun” (Psalm 84:11). And also, “The Sun of Righteousness shall arise with healing in His wings” (Malachi 4:2). The righteousness of Christ is a garment spoken of throughout Scripture as the clothing worn by the redeemed.

    She also stands with “the moon under her feet.” What could the church stand on that reflects the light of the sun? I believe nothing pointed to Christ more powerfully than the Jewish sacrificial system. Jesus said all the Old Testament Scriptures testify of Him (John 5:39). All these symbols and types pointed toward—or reflect—the great atonement of Jesus on Calvary.

    Finally, the number 12 represents the church and its leadership. In the Old Testament, there were 12 patriarchs of the 12 tribes and 12 judges. The New Jerusalem will have 12 foundations and 12 gates into the city. The number 12 is important to the Lord. So when we look at the 12 stars on her head, it makes sense that the head represents leadership—the 12 apostles who crowned the work of the early church.

    The most important question is, will you be part of the bride of Christ—God’s remnant people? The Lord invites each of us to be part of that bridal party and the marriage supper of the Lamb!
    KEY BIBLE TEXTS
    And there appeared a great wonder in heaven; a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet, and upon her head a crown of twelve stars: Revelation 12:1
    WHO IS THE WOMAN IN REVELATION 12:1 AND WHAT DO THE 12 STARS ON HER HEAD MEAN? Bible Study / Daily Devotional Daily Devotions Average reading time is about 5 and a half minutes In this passage, God’s church is represented as a bride. We find support for this in Jeremiah 6:2: “I have likened the daughter of Zion to a lovely and delicate woman.” The apostle Paul also supports this picture when he writes, “I am jealous for you with godly jealousy. For I have betrothed you to one husband, that I may present you as a chaste virgin to Christ” (2 Corinthians 11:2). See also Ephesians 5:22, 23 and Revelation 19:7, 8. This bride is spoken of as being “clothed with the sun.” Jesus is represented by the sun in the Bible. “The Lord God is a sun” (Psalm 84:11). And also, “The Sun of Righteousness shall arise with healing in His wings” (Malachi 4:2). The righteousness of Christ is a garment spoken of throughout Scripture as the clothing worn by the redeemed. She also stands with “the moon under her feet.” What could the church stand on that reflects the light of the sun? I believe nothing pointed to Christ more powerfully than the Jewish sacrificial system. Jesus said all the Old Testament Scriptures testify of Him (John 5:39). All these symbols and types pointed toward—or reflect—the great atonement of Jesus on Calvary. Finally, the number 12 represents the church and its leadership. In the Old Testament, there were 12 patriarchs of the 12 tribes and 12 judges. The New Jerusalem will have 12 foundations and 12 gates into the city. The number 12 is important to the Lord. So when we look at the 12 stars on her head, it makes sense that the head represents leadership—the 12 apostles who crowned the work of the early church. The most important question is, will you be part of the bride of Christ—God’s remnant people? The Lord invites each of us to be part of that bridal party and the marriage supper of the Lamb! KEY BIBLE TEXTS And there appeared a great wonder in heaven; a woman clothed with the sun, and the moon under her feet, and upon her head a crown of twelve stars: Revelation 12:1
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • The Anglo Saxons, Celtic, Germanic, Scandinavian and kindred peoples are the true Israelites of the Bible: https://www.bitchute.com/video/QSMgj39jwwKe/

    Why it matters: https://archive.org/details/physical-not-spiritual-israel

    Yahshua/Jesus is WHITE: https://www.bitchute.com/video/g3Iwpxdn6Sdc/

    100 proofs Israelites were WHITE: https://www.bitchute.com/video/IM79pFIxchxd/

    Letter from God, your Father: https://www.bitchute.com/video/7dGCd2wMTgHJ/


    Christians are ISRAEL: https://www.bitchute.com/video/BwQvtyfGAwAa/

    #Christians #Christianity #Israel #Israelites #Bible #Jesus #Yahshua #Christ #Messiah #Bibical #Sermons #Gospel #Whitepeople #stopWhitegenocide #nomorebrotherwars #WAKEUP #lostsheep #Whitepower #IsraelIdentity #IdentityinChrist #ChristisKING #JesusisKING #PraiseYHWH #PraiseYAHWEH #GODofIsrael #Biblebasics #knowyourhistory #loveyourrace #exposethenose #namethejew #synagogueofsatanEXPOSED #Whitelivesmatter #JacobIsrael #forefathers #Abraham #Patriarchs #Faith #Religion #inheritance #lineage #bloodline #Seedofthewoman #KinsmenRedeemer #Savior #Salvation #Truthwinsout
    The Anglo Saxons, Celtic, Germanic, Scandinavian and kindred peoples are the true Israelites of the Bible: https://www.bitchute.com/video/QSMgj39jwwKe/ Why it matters: https://archive.org/details/physical-not-spiritual-israel Yahshua/Jesus is WHITE: https://www.bitchute.com/video/g3Iwpxdn6Sdc/ 100 proofs Israelites were WHITE: https://www.bitchute.com/video/IM79pFIxchxd/ Letter from God, your Father: https://www.bitchute.com/video/7dGCd2wMTgHJ/ Christians are ISRAEL: https://www.bitchute.com/video/BwQvtyfGAwAa/ #Christians #Christianity #Israel #Israelites #Bible #Jesus #Yahshua #Christ #Messiah #Bibical #Sermons #Gospel #Whitepeople #stopWhitegenocide #nomorebrotherwars #WAKEUP #lostsheep #Whitepower #IsraelIdentity #IdentityinChrist #ChristisKING #JesusisKING #PraiseYHWH #PraiseYAHWEH #GODofIsrael #Biblebasics #knowyourhistory #loveyourrace #exposethenose #namethejew #synagogueofsatanEXPOSED #Whitelivesmatter #JacobIsrael #forefathers #Abraham #Patriarchs #Faith #Religion #inheritance #lineage #bloodline #Seedofthewoman #KinsmenRedeemer #Savior #Salvation #Truthwinsout
    1 Comments 0 Shares
  • 16 NOVEMBER (UNDATED SERMON)

    Seeing Jesus

    ‘We see Jesus.’ Hebrews 2:9
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Hebrews 11:1–16

    Rapid is the action of faith. Brethren, we know not where heaven may be, where the state, the place called ‘heaven’ is, but faith takes us there in contemplation in a single moment. We cannot tell when the Lord may come; it may not be for centuries yet, but faith steps over the distance in a moment, sees him coming in the clouds of heaven, and hears the trump of resurrection. It would be very difficult, indeed it would be impossible, for us to travel backward in any other chariot than that of faith, for it is faith which helps us to see the creation of the world ‘when the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy’.

    Faith enables us to walk in the garden with our first parents, and to witness the scene when God promised that the seed of the woman should bruise the serpent’s head. Faith makes us familiar with patriarchs, and gives us to see the troubles and trials of kings. Faith takes us to Calvary’s summit, where we stand and see our Saviour as plainly as did his mother when she stood sorrowfully at the foot of the cross. This day we can fly back to the solemn day of Pentecost and feel as if we could hear the mighty rushing wind, and see the cloven tongues sitting upon the chosen company; so swiftly does faith travel.

    And, best of all, in one moment faith can take a sinner out of a state of death into a state of life, can lift him from damnation into salvation, can remove him from the land of the shadow of death, where he sat in affliction and irons, and give him ‘the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness’. O sinner, you can get at Christ in a moment of time. No sooner has your heart trusted Jesus, than you are with him, united to him.

    FOR MEDITATION: Faith in the living God enables us to accept what he has done in the past (Hebrews 11:3) and to set our hopes upon what he is going to do in the future (Hebrews 11:13, 16). Consider the apostle Paul as he testified to his faith in the past and future works of God (Acts 24:14–15).


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 3), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2005), 328.
    16 NOVEMBER (UNDATED SERMON) Seeing Jesus ‘We see Jesus.’ Hebrews 2:9 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Hebrews 11:1–16 Rapid is the action of faith. Brethren, we know not where heaven may be, where the state, the place called ‘heaven’ is, but faith takes us there in contemplation in a single moment. We cannot tell when the Lord may come; it may not be for centuries yet, but faith steps over the distance in a moment, sees him coming in the clouds of heaven, and hears the trump of resurrection. It would be very difficult, indeed it would be impossible, for us to travel backward in any other chariot than that of faith, for it is faith which helps us to see the creation of the world ‘when the morning stars sang together, and all the sons of God shouted for joy’. Faith enables us to walk in the garden with our first parents, and to witness the scene when God promised that the seed of the woman should bruise the serpent’s head. Faith makes us familiar with patriarchs, and gives us to see the troubles and trials of kings. Faith takes us to Calvary’s summit, where we stand and see our Saviour as plainly as did his mother when she stood sorrowfully at the foot of the cross. This day we can fly back to the solemn day of Pentecost and feel as if we could hear the mighty rushing wind, and see the cloven tongues sitting upon the chosen company; so swiftly does faith travel. And, best of all, in one moment faith can take a sinner out of a state of death into a state of life, can lift him from damnation into salvation, can remove him from the land of the shadow of death, where he sat in affliction and irons, and give him ‘the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness’. O sinner, you can get at Christ in a moment of time. No sooner has your heart trusted Jesus, than you are with him, united to him. FOR MEDITATION: Faith in the living God enables us to accept what he has done in the past (Hebrews 11:3) and to set our hopes upon what he is going to do in the future (Hebrews 11:13, 16). Consider the apostle Paul as he testified to his faith in the past and future works of God (Acts 24:14–15). C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 3), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2005), 328.
    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Ten generations after Noah, Abraham was born to his father Terach in Mesopotamia. Terach was an idolater who lived in a kingdom ruled by King Nimrod. At three years of age, Abraham instinctively felt that it was illogical to worship statues of wood and stone. His mind began to wonder and explore, and over the course of time he ultimately became convinced of the notion of monotheism, one G‑d, a Superbeing who is omnipotent.

    From the very beginning, Abraham struggled against the prevalent current—an attribute inherited by his descendents.

    He was dubbed the Ivri (lit. “the other side”), for the whole world was on one side and he was on the other. Nimrod cast him into a fiery furnace for his “heretical” beliefs, yet he miraculously emerged unscathed, and began proclaiming his beliefs in public. Abraham was a great philosopher and astrologer. The Talmud teaches that, “Abraham held great astrology in his heart, and all the kings of the east and west arose early at his door.” He moved to Haran where at the age of seventy five, G‑d spoke to him in person for the first time and instructed him to leave his homeland and enter the Holy Land. When G‑d revealed Himself to Abraham, one of the first things that He told him was that his fate, and that of his descendants, transcended the influence of the constellations.

    Therefore, Abraham should not be concerned with astrological predictions.

    It is in the Holy Land where he met Malki Tzedek, King of Shalem, who was a priest to G‑d, the Most High (Genesis 14:18). Our Sages identify Malki Tzedek as Shem the son of Noah. There is evidence that the mystical tradition was taught to Abraham by Shem. According to some authorities Abraham authored Sefer Yetzirah (the Book of Formation), one of the fundamental works of Kabbalah.

    The Talmud states that Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob all studied in the academies of Shem and Eber. The Talmud further proclaims that the Patriarchs kept the entire Torah before it was given. How was this possible? The Kabbalists explain that they kept the Torah in its spiritual form, for it was only subsequently through Moses that the Torah instruction became manifest in the physical observance of Mitzvot. The Patriarchs, however, were well aware of the spiritual flow affected by Mitzvah performance. The Zohar parallels the biblical episode of Jacob with the sticks, troughs, and striped sheep with the Mitzvah of putting on tefillin. Both elicited a similar Divine emanation, however after Sinai, it was the Divine will that this spiritual flow came to be through laying a physical pair of tefillin.

    Abraham was also fully aware of the magical and idolatrous uses that could be developed from these mysteries, and the Talmud states that Abraham had a tract dealing with idolatry that consisted of 400 chapters. There is also a Talmudic teaching that Abraham taught the mysteries involving “unclean names” to the children of his concubines. This is based on the verse, “to the sons of the concubines that Abraham had, Abraham gave gifts, and he sent them away…to the lands of the East” (Genesis 25:6). These gifts consisted of occult mysteries, which then spread in eastern Asia. It is no wonder that in many of the eastern religions we find parallels to Kabbalistic teachings. One of the most simple and striking examples of the transmition of the occult is that every child knows a magician uses the phrase “Abracadabra.” This magical expression is none other than an Aramaic extension of the Hebrew abra— I will create, k’adabra—as I will speak—the knowledge of creation using letters and names as documented in Sefer Yetzirah.

    Ten generations after Noah, Abraham was born to his father Terach in Mesopotamia. Terach was an idolater who lived in a kingdom ruled by King Nimrod. At three years of age, Abraham instinctively felt that it was illogical to worship statues of wood and stone. His mind began to wonder and explore, and over the course of time he ultimately became convinced of the notion of monotheism, one G‑d, a Superbeing who is omnipotent. From the very beginning, Abraham struggled against the prevalent current—an attribute inherited by his descendents. He was dubbed the Ivri (lit. “the other side”), for the whole world was on one side and he was on the other. Nimrod cast him into a fiery furnace for his “heretical” beliefs, yet he miraculously emerged unscathed, and began proclaiming his beliefs in public. Abraham was a great philosopher and astrologer. The Talmud teaches that, “Abraham held great astrology in his heart, and all the kings of the east and west arose early at his door.” He moved to Haran where at the age of seventy five, G‑d spoke to him in person for the first time and instructed him to leave his homeland and enter the Holy Land. When G‑d revealed Himself to Abraham, one of the first things that He told him was that his fate, and that of his descendants, transcended the influence of the constellations. Therefore, Abraham should not be concerned with astrological predictions. It is in the Holy Land where he met Malki Tzedek, King of Shalem, who was a priest to G‑d, the Most High (Genesis 14:18). Our Sages identify Malki Tzedek as Shem the son of Noah. There is evidence that the mystical tradition was taught to Abraham by Shem. According to some authorities Abraham authored Sefer Yetzirah (the Book of Formation), one of the fundamental works of Kabbalah. The Talmud states that Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob all studied in the academies of Shem and Eber. The Talmud further proclaims that the Patriarchs kept the entire Torah before it was given. How was this possible? The Kabbalists explain that they kept the Torah in its spiritual form, for it was only subsequently through Moses that the Torah instruction became manifest in the physical observance of Mitzvot. The Patriarchs, however, were well aware of the spiritual flow affected by Mitzvah performance. The Zohar parallels the biblical episode of Jacob with the sticks, troughs, and striped sheep with the Mitzvah of putting on tefillin. Both elicited a similar Divine emanation, however after Sinai, it was the Divine will that this spiritual flow came to be through laying a physical pair of tefillin. Abraham was also fully aware of the magical and idolatrous uses that could be developed from these mysteries, and the Talmud states that Abraham had a tract dealing with idolatry that consisted of 400 chapters. There is also a Talmudic teaching that Abraham taught the mysteries involving “unclean names” to the children of his concubines. This is based on the verse, “to the sons of the concubines that Abraham had, Abraham gave gifts, and he sent them away…to the lands of the East” (Genesis 25:6). These gifts consisted of occult mysteries, which then spread in eastern Asia. It is no wonder that in many of the eastern religions we find parallels to Kabbalistic teachings. One of the most simple and striking examples of the transmition of the occult is that every child knows a magician uses the phrase “Abracadabra.” This magical expression is none other than an Aramaic extension of the Hebrew abra— I will create, k’adabra—as I will speak—the knowledge of creation using letters and names as documented in Sefer Yetzirah.
    1
    1 Comments 0 Shares
  • What a craving there oftentimes is in the heart of a child of God, to behold the Being whom he has worshipped so long, but whom he has never seen. It is true that he enjoys many aids to his faith and worship. The history of all these Divine manifestations to the patriarchs, and prophets, and apostles, is before him, and he reads it often and again. Still more, the story of the incarnation, and of the residence of God the Son here upon earth, he peruses over and over. These place the object of worship very plainly before him, in comparison with the dimness of natural religion, and the darkness of idolatry. Nevertheless, he desires a fuller manifestation than this, and looks forward to one in the future. He sees through a glass darkly, though living under the light of revelation; and says with David, “I shall be satisfied [only] when I awake in Thy likeness.”

    “If,” says Richard Baxter, “an angel from heaven should come down on earth to tell us all of God that we would know, and might lawfully desire and ask him, who would not turn his back upon libraries, and universities, and learned men, to go and discourse with such a messenger? What travel should I think too far, what cost too great, for one hour’s talk with such a messenger?” This is the utterance of that holy man when he was standing upon the borders of eternity, and was about to go over into the “everlasting rest” whose felicity he has described so well. This is one of his “Dying Thoughts,” and from it we see how ardently he desired to behold God, the great Object of worship, face to face. He had worshipped him long, and he had loved him long. He had enjoyed a clearer mental vision, probably, than is granted to most believers. And yet he is not satisfied. With the Psalmist he cries out: “As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God. My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God?”

    William G. T. Shedd, Sermons to the Spiritual Man, (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1884), 74–75.
    What a craving there oftentimes is in the heart of a child of God, to behold the Being whom he has worshipped so long, but whom he has never seen. It is true that he enjoys many aids to his faith and worship. The history of all these Divine manifestations to the patriarchs, and prophets, and apostles, is before him, and he reads it often and again. Still more, the story of the incarnation, and of the residence of God the Son here upon earth, he peruses over and over. These place the object of worship very plainly before him, in comparison with the dimness of natural religion, and the darkness of idolatry. Nevertheless, he desires a fuller manifestation than this, and looks forward to one in the future. He sees through a glass darkly, though living under the light of revelation; and says with David, “I shall be satisfied [only] when I awake in Thy likeness.” “If,” says Richard Baxter, “an angel from heaven should come down on earth to tell us all of God that we would know, and might lawfully desire and ask him, who would not turn his back upon libraries, and universities, and learned men, to go and discourse with such a messenger? What travel should I think too far, what cost too great, for one hour’s talk with such a messenger?” This is the utterance of that holy man when he was standing upon the borders of eternity, and was about to go over into the “everlasting rest” whose felicity he has described so well. This is one of his “Dying Thoughts,” and from it we see how ardently he desired to behold God, the great Object of worship, face to face. He had worshipped him long, and he had loved him long. He had enjoyed a clearer mental vision, probably, than is granted to most believers. And yet he is not satisfied. With the Psalmist he cries out: “As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God. My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God?” William G. T. Shedd, Sermons to the Spiritual Man, (New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1884), 74–75.
    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • 23 JULY (1871)

    Altogether lovely

    ‘Yea, he is altogether lovely.’ Song of Solomon 5:16
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Colossians 1:28–2:3

    When the old Puritan minister had delivered his discourse, and dwelt upon firstly, secondly, thirdly and perhaps upon twenty-fifthly, before he sat down he usually gave a comprehensive summary of all that he had spoken. Every one who carefully noted the summary would carry away the essence of the sermon. The summary was always looked upon by the Puritan hearer as one of the most valuable helps to memory and consequently a most important part of the discourse. In these five words the spouse here gives you her summary. She had delivered a tenfold discourse concerning her Lord; she had described in detail all his various beauties, and when she surveyed him from head to foot, she gathered up all her commendations in this sentence: ‘yea, he is altogether lovely.’

    Remember these words and know their meaning, and you possess the quintessence of the spouse’s portion of the Song of Songs. Now, as in this allegorical song, the bride sums up her witness in these words, so may I say that all the patriarchs, prophets, apostles, confessors and the entire body of the church have left us no other testimony. They all spoke of Christ and commended him. Whatever the type, symbol, obscure oracle or open word in which they bore witness, that witness all amounted to this: ‘yea, he is altogether lovely’; and I will add that since the canon of inspiration has closed, the testimony of all saints, on earth and in heaven, has continued to confirm the declaration made of old. The verdict of each particular saint and of the whole elect host as a body is still this: ‘yea, he is altogether lovely.’ From the sighs and the songs which mingle on the dying beds of saints, I hear this note supreme above all others, ‘he is altogether lovely’; and from the songs unmingled with groans, which perpetually peal forth from immortal tongues before the presence of the Most High, I hear this one master note, ‘yea, he is altogether lovely.’

    FOR MEDITATION: The apostle Paul instructed Christians to think about whatever is true, honest, just, pure, lovely, of good report, virtuous and praiseworthy (Philippians 4:8). There is surely no better way of covering all these than by remembering Jesus Christ (2 Timothy 2:8).


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 3), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2005), 212.
    23 JULY (1871) Altogether lovely ‘Yea, he is altogether lovely.’ Song of Solomon 5:16 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Colossians 1:28–2:3 When the old Puritan minister had delivered his discourse, and dwelt upon firstly, secondly, thirdly and perhaps upon twenty-fifthly, before he sat down he usually gave a comprehensive summary of all that he had spoken. Every one who carefully noted the summary would carry away the essence of the sermon. The summary was always looked upon by the Puritan hearer as one of the most valuable helps to memory and consequently a most important part of the discourse. In these five words the spouse here gives you her summary. She had delivered a tenfold discourse concerning her Lord; she had described in detail all his various beauties, and when she surveyed him from head to foot, she gathered up all her commendations in this sentence: ‘yea, he is altogether lovely.’ Remember these words and know their meaning, and you possess the quintessence of the spouse’s portion of the Song of Songs. Now, as in this allegorical song, the bride sums up her witness in these words, so may I say that all the patriarchs, prophets, apostles, confessors and the entire body of the church have left us no other testimony. They all spoke of Christ and commended him. Whatever the type, symbol, obscure oracle or open word in which they bore witness, that witness all amounted to this: ‘yea, he is altogether lovely’; and I will add that since the canon of inspiration has closed, the testimony of all saints, on earth and in heaven, has continued to confirm the declaration made of old. The verdict of each particular saint and of the whole elect host as a body is still this: ‘yea, he is altogether lovely.’ From the sighs and the songs which mingle on the dying beds of saints, I hear this note supreme above all others, ‘he is altogether lovely’; and from the songs unmingled with groans, which perpetually peal forth from immortal tongues before the presence of the Most High, I hear this one master note, ‘yea, he is altogether lovely.’ FOR MEDITATION: The apostle Paul instructed Christians to think about whatever is true, honest, just, pure, lovely, of good report, virtuous and praiseworthy (Philippians 4:8). There is surely no better way of covering all these than by remembering Jesus Christ (2 Timothy 2:8). C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 3), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2005), 212.
    0 Comments 0 Shares
Sponsored