I am a lover of God and country. I am a Life member of the VFW.
  • Sales Associate at USPS
  • Studied Business General at Spokane Falls Community College
  • Lives in Rosalia
  • From Ontonagon
  • Male
  • Married
  • 05/01/1970
  • Followed by 54 people
Recent Updates
  • March 2, 1951 – The U.S. Navy launched the K-1, the first modern submarine designed to hunt enemy submarines.
    March 2, 1951 – The U.S. Navy launched the K-1, the first modern submarine designed to hunt enemy submarines.
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  • March 2, 1865 – General Lee proposed peace to Grant. President Abraham Lincoln rejected Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s plea for peace talks, demanding unconditional surrender.
    March 2, 1865 – General Lee proposed peace to Grant. President Abraham Lincoln rejected Confederate General Robert E. Lee’s plea for peace talks, demanding unconditional surrender.
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  • Happy Birthday! March 2, 1793 – Samuel Houston, the first president of the independent Republic of Texas, is born in Rockbridge County, Virginia. When Houston was 14, his father died and his mother moved her nine children to the frontier village of Maryville, Tennessee. After working for a time in the Maryville general store, Houston joined the army at the age of 20. There he attracted the admiring attention of his commanding general, Andrew Jackson, and established a distinguished record in the War of 1812. In 1818, intrigued by politics, Houston decided to abandon the military for the law. He completed an 18-month law course in six months. By the following year, he had become a district attorney in Nashville, where he could make important political connections. Five years later, he ran for Congress and won. The people of Tennessee reelected him for a second term and twice made him their governor. Houston’s personal life, however, suffered as his political fortunes soared. In 1829, his wife abandoned him. Despondent, he resigned the governorship and went to live with Cherokee Indians in Arkansas, serving for several years as their spokesman in Washington. Houston’s interest in the fate of the Arkansas Cherokee led him to make several trips to the neighboring Mexican State of Texas. He became intrigued by the growing Texan movement for political independence from Mexico and decided to make Texas his new home. In 1836, he signed the Texas declaration of independence. Because of his previous military experience, his fellow rebels chose him as commander-in-chief of the revolutionary Texas army. Although his first efforts as a military strategist were failures, Houston led the Texan army to a spectacular victory over superior Mexican forces at San Jacinto in April 1836. Celebrated as the liberator of Texas, Houston easily won election later that year as the first president of the Republic of Texas. He immediately let it be known that Texas would like to become part of the United States. However, American fears of war with Mexico and questions over the extension of slavery into the new territory interfered with annexation for a decade. Finally, the aggressively expansionist President James Polk pushed Congress to grant statehood to Texas in 1846. Again an American citizen, Houston served for 14 years as a U.S. senator, where he argued eloquently for Native American rights. The divisive issue of slavery finally derailed Houston’s political career. His antislavery beliefs were out of step with the dominant southern ideology of Texas, and he staunchly resisted those who argued for southern secession from the Union during the 1850s. Nonetheless, his enduring popularity won him the governorship in 1859. When Texas voted to break from the Union in 1861, Houston refused to swear allegiance to the Confederacy. The Texas legislature voted to remove Houston from office and replaced him with a pro-Confederacy governor. Disillusioned, Houston retired to his farm near Huntsville. He died two years later, in 1863, while the fratricidal war he had sought to avoid continued to tear his beloved state and nation apart.
    Happy Birthday! March 2, 1793 – Samuel Houston, the first president of the independent Republic of Texas, is born in Rockbridge County, Virginia. When Houston was 14, his father died and his mother moved her nine children to the frontier village of Maryville, Tennessee. After working for a time in the Maryville general store, Houston joined the army at the age of 20. There he attracted the admiring attention of his commanding general, Andrew Jackson, and established a distinguished record in the War of 1812. In 1818, intrigued by politics, Houston decided to abandon the military for the law. He completed an 18-month law course in six months. By the following year, he had become a district attorney in Nashville, where he could make important political connections. Five years later, he ran for Congress and won. The people of Tennessee reelected him for a second term and twice made him their governor. Houston’s personal life, however, suffered as his political fortunes soared. In 1829, his wife abandoned him. Despondent, he resigned the governorship and went to live with Cherokee Indians in Arkansas, serving for several years as their spokesman in Washington. Houston’s interest in the fate of the Arkansas Cherokee led him to make several trips to the neighboring Mexican State of Texas. He became intrigued by the growing Texan movement for political independence from Mexico and decided to make Texas his new home. In 1836, he signed the Texas declaration of independence. Because of his previous military experience, his fellow rebels chose him as commander-in-chief of the revolutionary Texas army. Although his first efforts as a military strategist were failures, Houston led the Texan army to a spectacular victory over superior Mexican forces at San Jacinto in April 1836. Celebrated as the liberator of Texas, Houston easily won election later that year as the first president of the Republic of Texas. He immediately let it be known that Texas would like to become part of the United States. However, American fears of war with Mexico and questions over the extension of slavery into the new territory interfered with annexation for a decade. Finally, the aggressively expansionist President James Polk pushed Congress to grant statehood to Texas in 1846. Again an American citizen, Houston served for 14 years as a U.S. senator, where he argued eloquently for Native American rights. The divisive issue of slavery finally derailed Houston’s political career. His antislavery beliefs were out of step with the dominant southern ideology of Texas, and he staunchly resisted those who argued for southern secession from the Union during the 1850s. Nonetheless, his enduring popularity won him the governorship in 1859. When Texas voted to break from the Union in 1861, Houston refused to swear allegiance to the Confederacy. The Texas legislature voted to remove Houston from office and replaced him with a pro-Confederacy governor. Disillusioned, Houston retired to his farm near Huntsville. He died two years later, in 1863, while the fratricidal war he had sought to avoid continued to tear his beloved state and nation apart.
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  • https://www.christianity.com/church/church-history/timeline/601-900/chad-died-as-foretold-in-his-vision-11629734.html
    https://www.christianity.com/church/church-history/timeline/601-900/chad-died-as-foretold-in-his-vision-11629734.html
    Chad Died as Foretold in His Vision
    Chad waded hip-deep through the biggest controversy of seventh century England and never let it defile him. His place in history began when his oldest brother, Cedd, died of plague. Chad took Cedd's place as abbot of Lastingham in 664. At the tim...
    WWW.CHRISTIANITY.COM
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  • ARCHIMEDES DEATH RAY
    Bible Study / Daily Devotional
    Daily Devotions
    Average reading time is about 5 and a half minutes
    AN AMAZING FACT: Back in 1981, in the blazing desert near Barstow, California, the U.S. Department of Energy finished building what is called a “solar power tower.” It looked something like an ocean lighthouse in the middle of a barren desert surrounded by a flock of mirrors. “Solar One,” as it was called, was a pilot project constructed to generate electricity using the sun’s power. The tower was surrounded by 1,818 dedicated mirrors called heliostats that tracked the sun all day long.

    Their purpose was to reflect the sunlight to one common focal point—redirecting the equivalent of 600 suns to a target at the top of the tower. This hot spot became superheated, creating steam from water that turned an electric generator and produced 10 megawatts of power every day. In 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy completed a solar-powered unit in Boulder City, Nevada which can produce 64 megawatts of power each day, or about 134,000,000 kilowatt hours per year.

    This reminds me of an amazing event recorded by ancient Greek and Roman historians that has been much disputed by modern scholars. They claim that during the siege of Syracuse in 212 B.C., Archimedes, the famous ancient Greek inventor, constructed a sophisticated weapon. Through carefully arranging a combination of mirrors, he focused the magnified light of the sun to burn up an entire Roman fleet. Whenever an enemy warship came within the range of a bow shot, he directed the intense light at the vessel until it ignited. Because highly flammable pitch was used to seal the boats, they were quickly consumed. This incredible event in history has never been disproved, but many have put it to the test.

    Recently, a team from MIT tried to recreate the famous “Archimedes Death Ray.” With a series of mirrors carefully arranged, they were successful at starting a fire on a ship 75 feet away. Perhaps we should give more credit to ancient technology. After all, someone had to be pretty ingenious to build the pyramids.

    The Bible teaches us that Jesus is the Sun of Righteousness, and every Christian is to reflect that light in this dark world. The power generated can save souls!
    KEY BIBLE TEXTS
    But unto you that fear my name shall the Sun of righteousness arise with healing in his wings; and ye shall go forth, and grow up as calves of the stall. Malachi 4:2
    ARCHIMEDES DEATH RAY Bible Study / Daily Devotional Daily Devotions Average reading time is about 5 and a half minutes AN AMAZING FACT: Back in 1981, in the blazing desert near Barstow, California, the U.S. Department of Energy finished building what is called a “solar power tower.” It looked something like an ocean lighthouse in the middle of a barren desert surrounded by a flock of mirrors. “Solar One,” as it was called, was a pilot project constructed to generate electricity using the sun’s power. The tower was surrounded by 1,818 dedicated mirrors called heliostats that tracked the sun all day long. Their purpose was to reflect the sunlight to one common focal point—redirecting the equivalent of 600 suns to a target at the top of the tower. This hot spot became superheated, creating steam from water that turned an electric generator and produced 10 megawatts of power every day. In 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy completed a solar-powered unit in Boulder City, Nevada which can produce 64 megawatts of power each day, or about 134,000,000 kilowatt hours per year. This reminds me of an amazing event recorded by ancient Greek and Roman historians that has been much disputed by modern scholars. They claim that during the siege of Syracuse in 212 B.C., Archimedes, the famous ancient Greek inventor, constructed a sophisticated weapon. Through carefully arranging a combination of mirrors, he focused the magnified light of the sun to burn up an entire Roman fleet. Whenever an enemy warship came within the range of a bow shot, he directed the intense light at the vessel until it ignited. Because highly flammable pitch was used to seal the boats, they were quickly consumed. This incredible event in history has never been disproved, but many have put it to the test. Recently, a team from MIT tried to recreate the famous “Archimedes Death Ray.” With a series of mirrors carefully arranged, they were successful at starting a fire on a ship 75 feet away. Perhaps we should give more credit to ancient technology. After all, someone had to be pretty ingenious to build the pyramids. The Bible teaches us that Jesus is the Sun of Righteousness, and every Christian is to reflect that light in this dark world. The power generated can save souls! KEY BIBLE TEXTS But unto you that fear my name shall the Sun of righteousness arise with healing in his wings; and ye shall go forth, and grow up as calves of the stall. Malachi 4:2
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  • https://www.upperroom.org/devotionals/en-2021-03-02
    https://www.upperroom.org/devotionals/en-2021-03-02
    Upper Room Devotional for March 2nd, 2021
    When I was eight years old, I fell on a broken bottle; the glass cut my knee to the bone. The doctors stitched up my wound and wrapped my leg from my hip to below my knee. Every night my dad had to carry me up the stairs to bed. The first morning when he carried me back down, I looked at the...
    WWW.UPPERROOM.ORG
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  • https://www.lhm.org/dailydevotions/default.asp?date=20210302
    https://www.lhm.org/dailydevotions/default.asp?date=20210302
    COMMITMENT
    But then Jesus goes for the throat.
    WWW.LHM.ORG
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  • https://www.lentreflections.com/?vgo_ee=oTgoBBQUJKzXmFE3DZiSeovy7T5YEJ8ohjC9vauJg30%3D
    https://www.lentreflections.com/?vgo_ee=oTgoBBQUJKzXmFE3DZiSeovy7T5YEJ8ohjC9vauJg30%3D
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