Christian thoughts, meditations, sermons, hymns, and poetry. Anything I come across that is good for the soul.
Recent Updates
  • Man before God’s majesty

    Hence that dread and wonder with which Scripture commonly represents the saints as stricken and overcome whenever they felt the presence of God. Thus it comes about that we see men who in his absence normally remained firm and constant, but who, when he manifests his glory, are so shaken and struck dumb as to be laid low by the dread of death—are in fact overwhelmed by it and almost annihilated as a consequence, we must infer that man is never sufficiently touched and affected by the awareness of his lowly state until he has compared himself with God’s majesty.

    Moreover, we have numerous examples of this consternation both in The Book of Judges and in the Prophets. So frequent was it that this expression was common among God’s people: “We shall die, for the Lord has appeared to us” [Judg. 13:22; Isa. 6:5; Ezek. 2:1; 1:28; Judg. 6:22–23; and elsewhere].

    The story of Job, in its description of God’s wisdom, power, and purity, always expresses a powerful argument that overwhelms men with the realization of their own stupidity, impotence, and corruption [cf. Job 38:1 ff.]. And not without cause: for we see how Abraham recognizes more clearly that he is earth and dust [Gen. 18:27] when once he had come nearer to beholding God’s glory; and how Elijah, with uncovered face, cannot bear to await his approach, such is the awesomeness of his appearance [1 Kings 19:13]. And what can man do, who is rottenness itself [Job 13:28] and a worm [Job 7:5; Ps. 22:6], when even the very cherubim must veil their faces out of fear [Isa. 6:2]?

    It is this indeed of which the prophet Isaiah speaks: “The sun will blush and the moon be confounded when the Lord of Hosts shall reign” [Isa. 24:23]; that is, when he shall bring forth his splendor and cause it to draw nearer, the brightest thing will become darkness before it [Isa. 2:10, 19 p.].


    John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion & 2, ed. John T. McNeill, The Library of Christian Classics, (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 2011), 1:38–39.
    Man before God’s majesty Hence that dread and wonder with which Scripture commonly represents the saints as stricken and overcome whenever they felt the presence of God. Thus it comes about that we see men who in his absence normally remained firm and constant, but who, when he manifests his glory, are so shaken and struck dumb as to be laid low by the dread of death—are in fact overwhelmed by it and almost annihilated as a consequence, we must infer that man is never sufficiently touched and affected by the awareness of his lowly state until he has compared himself with God’s majesty. Moreover, we have numerous examples of this consternation both in The Book of Judges and in the Prophets. So frequent was it that this expression was common among God’s people: “We shall die, for the Lord has appeared to us” [Judg. 13:22; Isa. 6:5; Ezek. 2:1; 1:28; Judg. 6:22–23; and elsewhere]. The story of Job, in its description of God’s wisdom, power, and purity, always expresses a powerful argument that overwhelms men with the realization of their own stupidity, impotence, and corruption [cf. Job 38:1 ff.]. And not without cause: for we see how Abraham recognizes more clearly that he is earth and dust [Gen. 18:27] when once he had come nearer to beholding God’s glory; and how Elijah, with uncovered face, cannot bear to await his approach, such is the awesomeness of his appearance [1 Kings 19:13]. And what can man do, who is rottenness itself [Job 13:28] and a worm [Job 7:5; Ps. 22:6], when even the very cherubim must veil their faces out of fear [Isa. 6:2]? It is this indeed of which the prophet Isaiah speaks: “The sun will blush and the moon be confounded when the Lord of Hosts shall reign” [Isa. 24:23]; that is, when he shall bring forth his splendor and cause it to draw nearer, the brightest thing will become darkness before it [Isa. 2:10, 19 p.]. John Calvin, Institutes of the Christian Religion & 2, ed. John T. McNeill, The Library of Christian Classics, (Louisville, KY: Westminster John Knox Press, 2011), 1:38–39.
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • So, we have the spectacle of two mighty divinities, Neptune and Apollo, unable to tell that Laomedon was going to cheat them of their pay, building up the walls of Troy—and all for nothing but ingratitude. Pagans should reflect whether it is really not more criminal to believe in such gods than to violate one’s oath to them.
    https://thepilgrimjournal.com/the-city-of-god-book-3-chapters-one-and-two/
    So, we have the spectacle of two mighty divinities, Neptune and Apollo, unable to tell that Laomedon was going to cheat them of their pay, building up the walls of Troy—and all for nothing but ingratitude. Pagans should reflect whether it is really not more criminal to believe in such gods than to violate one’s oath to them. https://thepilgrimjournal.com/the-city-of-god-book-3-chapters-one-and-two/
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Diabolus, as filled with despair of retaining in his hands the famous town of Mansoul, resolved to do what mischief he could, if indeed, he could do any, to the army of the Prince, and to the famous town of Mansoul; for, alas! it was not the happiness of the silly town of Mansoul that was designed by Diabolus, but the utter ruin and overthrow thereof; as now is enough in view. Wherefore he commands his officers that they should then, when they see that they could hold the town no longer, do it what harm and mischief they could; rending and tearing of men, women, and children (Mark 9:26–27). For, said he, we had better quite demolish the place, and leave it like a ruinous heap, than so leave it that it may be an habitation for Emmanuel.
    https://thepilgrimjournal.com/a-relation-of-the-holy-war-chapter-vii/
    Diabolus, as filled with despair of retaining in his hands the famous town of Mansoul, resolved to do what mischief he could, if indeed, he could do any, to the army of the Prince, and to the famous town of Mansoul; for, alas! it was not the happiness of the silly town of Mansoul that was designed by Diabolus, but the utter ruin and overthrow thereof; as now is enough in view. Wherefore he commands his officers that they should then, when they see that they could hold the town no longer, do it what harm and mischief they could; rending and tearing of men, women, and children (Mark 9:26–27). For, said he, we had better quite demolish the place, and leave it like a ruinous heap, than so leave it that it may be an habitation for Emmanuel. https://thepilgrimjournal.com/a-relation-of-the-holy-war-chapter-vii/
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • This is the subtlety of the old serpent; first he conveys one claw or talent into a man’s heart, and then another; after that he gets in his head, and so at length winds in all his body. Thus he assayed to do with Christ, and so will he continue towards all God’s children,
    https://thepilgrimjournal.com/combat-between-christ-and-the-devil-three/
    This is the subtlety of the old serpent; first he conveys one claw or talent into a man’s heart, and then another; after that he gets in his head, and so at length winds in all his body. Thus he assayed to do with Christ, and so will he continue towards all God’s children, https://thepilgrimjournal.com/combat-between-christ-and-the-devil-three/
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Lord Understanding and Mr. Conscience imprisoned as authors of the disturbance—A conference of the besieging officers, who agree to petition Shaddai for further assistance—The petition approved at court—Emmanuel, the King’s son, is appointed to conquer the town—Marches with a great army and surrounds Mansoul, which is strongly fortified against him.
    https://thepilgrimjournal.com/a-relation-of-the-holy-war-chapter-vi/
    Lord Understanding and Mr. Conscience imprisoned as authors of the disturbance—A conference of the besieging officers, who agree to petition Shaddai for further assistance—The petition approved at court—Emmanuel, the King’s son, is appointed to conquer the town—Marches with a great army and surrounds Mansoul, which is strongly fortified against him. https://thepilgrimjournal.com/a-relation-of-the-holy-war-chapter-vi/
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • The first time the trumpeter went, he went with words of peace, telling of them, ‘That the captains, the noble captains of Shaddai, did pity and bewail the misery of the now perishing town of Mansoul; and were troubled to see them so much to stand in the way of their own deliverance.’
    https://thepilgrimjournal.com/a-relation-of-the-holy-war-chapter-v/
    The first time the trumpeter went, he went with words of peace, telling of them, ‘That the captains, the noble captains of Shaddai, did pity and bewail the misery of the now perishing town of Mansoul; and were troubled to see them so much to stand in the way of their own deliverance.’ https://thepilgrimjournal.com/a-relation-of-the-holy-war-chapter-v/
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • And that Ear-gate especially might the better be looked to—for that was the gate in at which the King’s forces sought most to enter—the Lord Will-be-will made one old Mr. Prejudice, an angry and ill-conditioned fellow, captain of the ward at that gate, and put under his power sixty men, called Deafmen; men advantageous for that service, forasmuch as they mattered no words of the captains, nor of their soldiers.
    https://thepilgrimjournal.com/a-relation-of-the-holy-war-chapter-iv/
    And that Ear-gate especially might the better be looked to—for that was the gate in at which the King’s forces sought most to enter—the Lord Will-be-will made one old Mr. Prejudice, an angry and ill-conditioned fellow, captain of the ward at that gate, and put under his power sixty men, called Deafmen; men advantageous for that service, forasmuch as they mattered no words of the captains, nor of their soldiers. https://thepilgrimjournal.com/a-relation-of-the-holy-war-chapter-iv/
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • The fanatic is generally an intellectual person. He is vehement and extreme, not for the sake of a vice or a pleasure, but for the sake of an opinion or a doctrine. His ungoverned temper does not commonly spring out of sensual appetites and indulgences. On the contrary, his blood is usually cold and thin, and his life abstemious and ascetical. But his passion runs to his brain. He holds an intellectual opinion or an intellectual conviction that is but a half-truth, with a spasmodic energy; and the consequence is, that he is swift to anger, and reckless of consequences in that direction.
    https://thepilgrimjournal.com/christian-moderation/
    The fanatic is generally an intellectual person. He is vehement and extreme, not for the sake of a vice or a pleasure, but for the sake of an opinion or a doctrine. His ungoverned temper does not commonly spring out of sensual appetites and indulgences. On the contrary, his blood is usually cold and thin, and his life abstemious and ascetical. But his passion runs to his brain. He holds an intellectual opinion or an intellectual conviction that is but a half-truth, with a spasmodic energy; and the consequence is, that he is swift to anger, and reckless of consequences in that direction. https://thepilgrimjournal.com/christian-moderation/
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Then, as my soul to heaven her first seat takes flight,
    And earth-born body in the earth shall dwell,
    So fall my sins, that all may have their right,
    To where they’re bred and would press me to hell.
    https://thepilgrimjournal.com/this-is-my-plays-last-scene/
    Then, as my soul to heaven her first seat takes flight, And earth-born body in the earth shall dwell, So fall my sins, that all may have their right, To where they’re bred and would press me to hell. https://thepilgrimjournal.com/this-is-my-plays-last-scene/
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • The battle rages between the Holy Spirit and Satan over us. As a result, it is also a battle between our own faith fostered by the Holy Spirit and our own wicked heart, behind which Satan hunkers down.
    https://thepilgrimjournal.com/renew-a-steadfast-spirit-in-my-inmost-parts/
    The battle rages between the Holy Spirit and Satan over us. As a result, it is also a battle between our own faith fostered by the Holy Spirit and our own wicked heart, behind which Satan hunkers down. https://thepilgrimjournal.com/renew-a-steadfast-spirit-in-my-inmost-parts/
    0 Comments 0 Shares
More Stories