• Pastor Robert Breaker - #sermon #kjv #kingjamesbible #bible #biblestudy #scriptures - Doctrine of #Blood #Atonement https://rumble.com/v15qs0f-the-doctrine-of-blood-atonement.html
    Pastor Robert Breaker - #sermon #kjv #kingjamesbible #bible #biblestudy #scriptures - Doctrine of #Blood #Atonement https://rumble.com/v15qs0f-the-doctrine-of-blood-atonement.html
    RUMBLE.COM
    The Doctrine of Blood Atonement
    This is the reedited version of the sermon for Sunday, October 26, 2014, the fifth sermon preached in English on www.thecloudchurch.org. It was preached by Pastor/Missionary Evangelist Robert Breaker,
    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Pastor Bryan Denlinger: #sermon #kjv #kingjamesbible #scriptures #bible #biblestudy #1Corinthians15:1-4 The #Blood #Atonement Is Useless Without This https://rumble.com/v15tjqc-the-blood-atonement-is-useless-without-this.html
    Pastor Bryan Denlinger: #sermon #kjv #kingjamesbible #scriptures #bible #biblestudy #1Corinthians15:1-4 The #Blood #Atonement Is Useless Without This https://rumble.com/v15tjqc-the-blood-atonement-is-useless-without-this.html
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • 1 DECEMBER (PREACHED 2 DECEMBER 1877)

    The evidence of our Lord’s wounds

    ‘Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faithless, but believing.’ John 20:27
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: John 19:17–37

    If you would have your faith made vivid and strong, study much the story of your Saviour’s death. ‘Take it: read it’, said the voice to Augustine. So say I. Take the four evangelists; take the fifty-third chapter of Isaiah; take the twenty-second psalm; take all other parts of Scripture that relate to our suffering Substitute, and read them by day and night, till you familiarize yourself with the whole story of his griefs and sin-bearing. Keep your mind intently fixed upon it, not sometimes but continually. The cross is light. You shall see it by its own light.

    The study of the narrative, if you ask the Holy Spirit to enlighten you, will beget faith in you, and by its means you will be very greatly helped, till at last you will say, ‘I cannot doubt. The truth of the atonement is impressed upon my memory, heart and understanding. The record has convinced me.’ If this suffice not, frequently contemplate the sufferings of Jesus. When you have read the story, sit down and try to picture it. Let your mind conceive it as passing before you. Put yourself into the position of the apostles who saw him die. No employment will so greatly strengthen faith, and certainly none will be more enjoyable!

    ‘Sweet the moments, rich in blessing, which before the cross I spend,
    Life and health and peace possessing from the sinner’s dying Friend.’

    An hour would be grandly spent if occupied in turning over each little detail, item and incident in the marvellous death by which you are redeemed from death and hell. You will be surprised to find how this familiarizing of yourself with it, by the help of the Holy Spirit, will make it as vivid to you as if you saw it.

    FOR MEDITATION: (Our Own Hymn Book no.282 v.1—Isaac Watts, 1709)
    ‘When I survey the wondrous cross on which the Prince of Glory died,
    My richest gain I count but loss, and pour contempt on all my pride.’


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 346.
    1 DECEMBER (PREACHED 2 DECEMBER 1877) The evidence of our Lord’s wounds ‘Then saith he to Thomas, Reach hither thy finger, and behold my hands; and reach hither thy hand, and thrust it into my side: and be not faithless, but believing.’ John 20:27 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: John 19:17–37 If you would have your faith made vivid and strong, study much the story of your Saviour’s death. ‘Take it: read it’, said the voice to Augustine. So say I. Take the four evangelists; take the fifty-third chapter of Isaiah; take the twenty-second psalm; take all other parts of Scripture that relate to our suffering Substitute, and read them by day and night, till you familiarize yourself with the whole story of his griefs and sin-bearing. Keep your mind intently fixed upon it, not sometimes but continually. The cross is light. You shall see it by its own light. The study of the narrative, if you ask the Holy Spirit to enlighten you, will beget faith in you, and by its means you will be very greatly helped, till at last you will say, ‘I cannot doubt. The truth of the atonement is impressed upon my memory, heart and understanding. The record has convinced me.’ If this suffice not, frequently contemplate the sufferings of Jesus. When you have read the story, sit down and try to picture it. Let your mind conceive it as passing before you. Put yourself into the position of the apostles who saw him die. No employment will so greatly strengthen faith, and certainly none will be more enjoyable! ‘Sweet the moments, rich in blessing, which before the cross I spend, Life and health and peace possessing from the sinner’s dying Friend.’ An hour would be grandly spent if occupied in turning over each little detail, item and incident in the marvellous death by which you are redeemed from death and hell. You will be surprised to find how this familiarizing of yourself with it, by the help of the Holy Spirit, will make it as vivid to you as if you saw it. FOR MEDITATION: (Our Own Hymn Book no.282 v.1—Isaac Watts, 1709) ‘When I survey the wondrous cross on which the Prince of Glory died, My richest gain I count but loss, and pour contempt on all my pride.’ C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 346.
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Belgian princess calls for the removal of Leopold II statues over colonialism in Congo.
    A princess has broken ranks with the rest of the Belgian royal family to call for statues of her ancestor Leopold II to be removed in atonement for the country’s colonialism in the Congo.
    The Belgian monarch ruled the “Congo Free State” as his personal colony between 1885 and 1908, when at least ten million Congolese people, over half the population, either died or were killed.

    Belgian princess calls for the removal of Leopold II statues over colonialism in Congo. A princess has broken ranks with the rest of the Belgian royal family to call for statues of her ancestor Leopold II to be removed in atonement for the country’s colonialism in the Congo. The Belgian monarch ruled the “Congo Free State” as his personal colony between 1885 and 1908, when at least ten million Congolese people, over half the population, either died or were killed.
    1
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • 25 NOVEMBER (1877)

    Sins of ignorance

    ‘And if a soul sin, and commit any of these things which are forbidden to be done by the commandments of the LORD; though he wist it not, yet is he guilty, and shall bear his iniquity. And he shall bring a ram without blemish out of the flock, with thy estimation, for a trespass offering, unto the priest: and the priest shall make an atonement for him concerning his ignorance wherein he erred and wist it not, and it shall be forgiven him.’ Leviticus 5:17–18
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Numbers 15:17–31

    Knowledge of the law was a duty and ignorance a crime. Can one sin be an excuse for another? It is a sin to refuse to search into the word of God: can it be that because a man commits this sin he is to be excused for the faults into which his wilful ignorance leads him? It is out of the question. If sins of ignorance are not sins, Christ’s intercession was superfluous.

    Our text last Sabbath morning (see 18 November) was ‘he … made intercession for the transgressors’; we illustrated it by the text ‘Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.’ If there is no sin when a man does not know what he does, why did our Lord pray for ignorant transgressors? Why ask forgiveness if there be no wrong? The correct way of putting it would have been, ‘Father, I do not ask thee to forgive, for there is no offence, seeing that they know not what they do’; but by his pleading for forgiveness it is clearly proved that there is guilt in the sin of ignorance. The work of the Holy Spirit would be evil instead of a good work in the hearts of men, if ignorance were an excuse for sin, for he has come to convince the world of sin; but if, unconvinced of sin, they are innocent, why convince them of it? Of what use is it to quicken a conscience, enlighten it and make it bleed over a transgression, if it would be no transgression, provided that conscience had never been made cognisant of it? Who shall so blaspheme the Holy Spirit as to say that his work is needless and even idle? Sins of ignorance, therefore, must be sinful.

    FOR MEDITATION: Ignorance is associated with foolishness (Psalm 73:22; 1 Peter 2:15), blindness (Ephesians 4:18), unbelief (1 Timothy 1:13), lusts (1 Peter 1:14) and wilfulness (2 Peter 3:5). Far from being ‘bliss’, ignorance calls for repentance (Acts 3:17–19; 17:30).


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 340.
    25 NOVEMBER (1877) Sins of ignorance ‘And if a soul sin, and commit any of these things which are forbidden to be done by the commandments of the LORD; though he wist it not, yet is he guilty, and shall bear his iniquity. And he shall bring a ram without blemish out of the flock, with thy estimation, for a trespass offering, unto the priest: and the priest shall make an atonement for him concerning his ignorance wherein he erred and wist it not, and it shall be forgiven him.’ Leviticus 5:17–18 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Numbers 15:17–31 Knowledge of the law was a duty and ignorance a crime. Can one sin be an excuse for another? It is a sin to refuse to search into the word of God: can it be that because a man commits this sin he is to be excused for the faults into which his wilful ignorance leads him? It is out of the question. If sins of ignorance are not sins, Christ’s intercession was superfluous. Our text last Sabbath morning (see 18 November) was ‘he … made intercession for the transgressors’; we illustrated it by the text ‘Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.’ If there is no sin when a man does not know what he does, why did our Lord pray for ignorant transgressors? Why ask forgiveness if there be no wrong? The correct way of putting it would have been, ‘Father, I do not ask thee to forgive, for there is no offence, seeing that they know not what they do’; but by his pleading for forgiveness it is clearly proved that there is guilt in the sin of ignorance. The work of the Holy Spirit would be evil instead of a good work in the hearts of men, if ignorance were an excuse for sin, for he has come to convince the world of sin; but if, unconvinced of sin, they are innocent, why convince them of it? Of what use is it to quicken a conscience, enlighten it and make it bleed over a transgression, if it would be no transgression, provided that conscience had never been made cognisant of it? Who shall so blaspheme the Holy Spirit as to say that his work is needless and even idle? Sins of ignorance, therefore, must be sinful. FOR MEDITATION: Ignorance is associated with foolishness (Psalm 73:22; 1 Peter 2:15), blindness (Ephesians 4:18), unbelief (1 Timothy 1:13), lusts (1 Peter 1:14) and wilfulness (2 Peter 3:5). Far from being ‘bliss’, ignorance calls for repentance (Acts 3:17–19; 17:30). C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 340.
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • 19 NOVEMBER (1876)

    Christ the end of the law

    ‘For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth.’ Romans 10:4
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Galatians 3:23–4:7

    ‘Christ is the end of the law’ in the sense that he is the termination of it. His people are not under it as a covenant of life. We ‘are not under the law, but under grace’. The old covenant as it stood with father Adam was, ‘This do and thou shalt live’; its command he did not keep and consequently he did not live, nor do we live in him, since in Adam all died. The old covenant was broken and we became condemned thereby, but now, having suffered death in Christ, we are no more under it, but are dead to it.

    Brethren, at this present moment, although we rejoice to do good works, we are not seeking life through them; we are not hoping to obtain divine favour by our own goodness, nor even to keep ourselves in the love of God by any merit of our own. Chosen, not for our works, but according to the eternal will and good pleasure of God, and called, not of works, but by the Spirit of God, we desire to continue in this grace and return no more to the bondage of the old covenant. Since we have put our trust in an atonement provided and applied by grace through Jesus Christ, we are no longer slaves but children, not working to be saved, but saved already and working because we are saved. Neither that which we do, nor even that which the Spirit of God works in us, is to us the ground and basis of the love of God toward us, since he loved us from the first, because he would love us, unworthy though we were; and he loves us still in Christ and looks upon us not as we are in ourselves, but as we are in him, washed in his blood and covered in his righteousness; ‘ye are not under the law’.

    FOR MEDITATION: (Our Own Hymn Book no.647 v.4—William Cowper, 1779)
    ‘Then all my servile works were done
    A righteousness to raise;
    Now, freely chosen in the Son,
    I freely choose His ways.’


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 334.
    19 NOVEMBER (1876) Christ the end of the law ‘For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth.’ Romans 10:4 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Galatians 3:23–4:7 ‘Christ is the end of the law’ in the sense that he is the termination of it. His people are not under it as a covenant of life. We ‘are not under the law, but under grace’. The old covenant as it stood with father Adam was, ‘This do and thou shalt live’; its command he did not keep and consequently he did not live, nor do we live in him, since in Adam all died. The old covenant was broken and we became condemned thereby, but now, having suffered death in Christ, we are no more under it, but are dead to it. Brethren, at this present moment, although we rejoice to do good works, we are not seeking life through them; we are not hoping to obtain divine favour by our own goodness, nor even to keep ourselves in the love of God by any merit of our own. Chosen, not for our works, but according to the eternal will and good pleasure of God, and called, not of works, but by the Spirit of God, we desire to continue in this grace and return no more to the bondage of the old covenant. Since we have put our trust in an atonement provided and applied by grace through Jesus Christ, we are no longer slaves but children, not working to be saved, but saved already and working because we are saved. Neither that which we do, nor even that which the Spirit of God works in us, is to us the ground and basis of the love of God toward us, since he loved us from the first, because he would love us, unworthy though we were; and he loves us still in Christ and looks upon us not as we are in ourselves, but as we are in him, washed in his blood and covered in his righteousness; ‘ye are not under the law’. FOR MEDITATION: (Our Own Hymn Book no.647 v.4—William Cowper, 1779) ‘Then all my servile works were done A righteousness to raise; Now, freely chosen in the Son, I freely choose His ways.’ C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 334.
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • Weekly Sabbath Days are Determined by the Moon

    Food for Thought guys and gals!
    We KNOW that God did not want the Sabbath observed on "Sun Day"
    The Gregorian Calendar did not even exist in those days!

    So HOW could we know when the Sabbath was???
    I'm no biblical scholar.... But I believe that he gave us the answer!
    I'm just a guy searching for TRUTH!

    It is found right where one would
    expect to find it – in the record of the fourth day of Creation. “And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and for years”
    (Gen. 1:14.)

    The word here translated “seasons” is mo’ed (#4150.)1
    It means:
    Congregation, festive gathering; appointment, signal. . . . Mo’ed often designates
    a determined time or place without any regard for the purpose. Since the Jewish
    festivals occurred at regular intervals, this word becomes closely identified with
    them . . . Mo’ed is used in a broad sense for all religious assemblies. It was
    closely associated with the tabernacle itself . . . God met Israel there at specific
    times for the purpose of revealing His will. It is a common term for the
    worshiping assembly of God’s people.2
    Genesis 1:14 reveals that God created the “lights in the firmament” to be the means by which His
    people may know when His mo’ed’s occur. This is supported by Psalm 104:19: “He appointed
    the moon for seasons.” Again, the word here translated “seasons” is mo’ed.

    All of God’s worship days in the Bible are called mo’eds. Leviticus 23 lists all of them. The
    very first one listed is the seventh-day Sabbath:
    And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, Speak unto the children of Israel, and
    say unto them, Concerning the feasts (mo’ed) of the LORD, which ye shall
    proclaim to be holy convocations, even these are my feasts (mo’ed). Six days
    shall work be done: but the seventh day is the Sabbath of rest, a holy convocation;
    ye shall do no work therein: it is the Sabbath of the LORD in all your dwellings.3
    From there, God goes on to list the rest of His mo’eds – Passover, Feast of Unleavened Bread, First Fruits, Pentecost, Feast of Trumpets, Day of Atonement, and Feast of Tabernacles. They are all called mo’eds. People who keep the feasts, figure them by the moon, but the very first “feast” listed is the weekly feast (mo’ed) of the seventh-day Sabbath.

    Anciently, the Jews waited to observe the first crescent of the moon and then the day following that sighting was New Moon day.
    The Hebrew month was lunar,4 beginning with the evening on which the crescent moon appeared. The 1st day of the month was called the new moon (1 Samuel 20:24-27) . . .

    At first, visual observation was used to determine the appearance of the crescent. If the crescent was seen on the evening following the 29th day of the month, a new month had begun; if not, another day was added

    https://www.ministersnewcovenant.org/uploads/9/1/6/1/9161032/ls_book_2013_1.0.pdf

    Share
    Emoji
    Weekly Sabbath Days are Determined by the Moon Food for Thought guys and gals! We KNOW that God did not want the Sabbath observed on "Sun Day" The Gregorian Calendar did not even exist in those days! So HOW could we know when the Sabbath was??? I'm no biblical scholar.... But I believe that he gave us the answer! I'm just a guy searching for TRUTH! It is found right where one would expect to find it – in the record of the fourth day of Creation. “And God said, Let there be lights in the firmament of the heaven to divide the day from the night; and let them be for signs, and for seasons, and for days, and for years” (Gen. 1:14.) The word here translated “seasons” is mo’ed (#4150.)1 It means: Congregation, festive gathering; appointment, signal. . . . Mo’ed often designates a determined time or place without any regard for the purpose. Since the Jewish festivals occurred at regular intervals, this word becomes closely identified with them . . . Mo’ed is used in a broad sense for all religious assemblies. It was closely associated with the tabernacle itself . . . God met Israel there at specific times for the purpose of revealing His will. It is a common term for the worshiping assembly of God’s people.2 Genesis 1:14 reveals that God created the “lights in the firmament” to be the means by which His people may know when His mo’ed’s occur. This is supported by Psalm 104:19: “He appointed the moon for seasons.” Again, the word here translated “seasons” is mo’ed. All of God’s worship days in the Bible are called mo’eds. Leviticus 23 lists all of them. The very first one listed is the seventh-day Sabbath: And the LORD spake unto Moses, saying, Speak unto the children of Israel, and say unto them, Concerning the feasts (mo’ed) of the LORD, which ye shall proclaim to be holy convocations, even these are my feasts (mo’ed). Six days shall work be done: but the seventh day is the Sabbath of rest, a holy convocation; ye shall do no work therein: it is the Sabbath of the LORD in all your dwellings.3 From there, God goes on to list the rest of His mo’eds – Passover, Feast of Unleavened Bread, First Fruits, Pentecost, Feast of Trumpets, Day of Atonement, and Feast of Tabernacles. They are all called mo’eds. People who keep the feasts, figure them by the moon, but the very first “feast” listed is the weekly feast (mo’ed) of the seventh-day Sabbath. Anciently, the Jews waited to observe the first crescent of the moon and then the day following that sighting was New Moon day. The Hebrew month was lunar,4 beginning with the evening on which the crescent moon appeared. The 1st day of the month was called the new moon (1 Samuel 20:24-27) . . . At first, visual observation was used to determine the appearance of the crescent. If the crescent was seen on the evening following the 29th day of the month, a new month had begun; if not, another day was added https://www.ministersnewcovenant.org/uploads/9/1/6/1/9161032/ls_book_2013_1.0.pdf Share Emoji
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • 19 OCTOBER (1873)

    To Sabbath-school teachers and other soul-winners

    ‘Brethren, if any of you do err from the truth, and one convert him; let him know, that he which converteth the sinner from the error of his way shall save a soul from death, and shall hide a multitude of sins.’ James 5:19–20
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: 2 Peter 1:19–2:3

    Modern thinkers treat revealed truth with entire indifference; though they may feel sorry that wilder spirits go too far in free thinking, and wish they would be more moderate, yet so large is their liberality that they are not sure enough of anything to be able to condemn the reverse of it as a deadly error. To them black and white are terms which may be applied to the same colour as you view it from different standpoints. Yes and no are equally true in their esteem. Their theology shifts like the Goodwin Sands, and they regard all firmness as bigotry. Errors and truths are equally comprehensible within the circle of their charity.

    It was not in this way that the apostles regarded error. They did not prescribe large-hearted charity towards falsehood, or hold up the errorist as a man of deep thought, whose views were ‘refreshingly original’; far less did they utter some wicked nonsense about the probability of more faith living in honest doubts than in half the creeds. They did not believe in justification by doubting, but set about the conversion of the erring brother, treated him as a person who needed conversion, and viewed him as a man who, if he were not converted, would suffer the death of his soul and be covered with a multitude of sins. They were not such easy-going people as our cultured friends of the school of ‘modern thought’, who have learned that the deity of Christ may be denied, the work of the Holy Spirit ignored, the inspiration of Scripture rejected, the atonement disbelieved, and regeneration dispensed with, and yet the man who does all this may be as good a Christian as the most devout believer!

    O God, deliver us from their deceitful infidelity, which, while it damages the erring man and often prevents his being reclaimed, does yet more mischief to our own hearts by teaching us that truth is unimportant.

    FOR MEDITATION: ‘To utter error against the LORD’ (Isaiah 32:6) is foolish, sinful and punishable by God (Romans 1:24–27). We must carefully discern error (1 John 4:1–6), otherwise we may get led astray and destabilised by it (2 Peter 3:17).


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 303.
    19 OCTOBER (1873) To Sabbath-school teachers and other soul-winners ‘Brethren, if any of you do err from the truth, and one convert him; let him know, that he which converteth the sinner from the error of his way shall save a soul from death, and shall hide a multitude of sins.’ James 5:19–20 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: 2 Peter 1:19–2:3 Modern thinkers treat revealed truth with entire indifference; though they may feel sorry that wilder spirits go too far in free thinking, and wish they would be more moderate, yet so large is their liberality that they are not sure enough of anything to be able to condemn the reverse of it as a deadly error. To them black and white are terms which may be applied to the same colour as you view it from different standpoints. Yes and no are equally true in their esteem. Their theology shifts like the Goodwin Sands, and they regard all firmness as bigotry. Errors and truths are equally comprehensible within the circle of their charity. It was not in this way that the apostles regarded error. They did not prescribe large-hearted charity towards falsehood, or hold up the errorist as a man of deep thought, whose views were ‘refreshingly original’; far less did they utter some wicked nonsense about the probability of more faith living in honest doubts than in half the creeds. They did not believe in justification by doubting, but set about the conversion of the erring brother, treated him as a person who needed conversion, and viewed him as a man who, if he were not converted, would suffer the death of his soul and be covered with a multitude of sins. They were not such easy-going people as our cultured friends of the school of ‘modern thought’, who have learned that the deity of Christ may be denied, the work of the Holy Spirit ignored, the inspiration of Scripture rejected, the atonement disbelieved, and regeneration dispensed with, and yet the man who does all this may be as good a Christian as the most devout believer! O God, deliver us from their deceitful infidelity, which, while it damages the erring man and often prevents his being reclaimed, does yet more mischief to our own hearts by teaching us that truth is unimportant. FOR MEDITATION: ‘To utter error against the LORD’ (Isaiah 32:6) is foolish, sinful and punishable by God (Romans 1:24–27). We must carefully discern error (1 John 4:1–6), otherwise we may get led astray and destabilised by it (2 Peter 3:17). C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 303.
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • 14 OCTOBER (1877)

    The righteous Father known and loved

    ‘O righteous Father, the world hath not known thee: but I have known thee, and these have known that thou hast sent me. And I have declared unto them thy name, and will declare it: that the love wherewith thou hast loved me may be in them, and I in them.’ John 17:25–26
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: 1 John 2:23–3:1

    In verse 25 there is a testing name given to God, by which we may decide whether we know the name of the Lord or not. It is this: ‘righteous Father’. I do not know that in any other portion of Scripture God is called by that name. In this prayer Jesus had not addressed the Father by that title before. He had spoken of him as ‘Father’ and also as ‘Holy Father’, but here alone it is—‘righteous Father’. I say that the knowledge of this name may serve as a test as to whether you do truly and spiritually know God, or have only a notional and outward idea of him. If you know him aright you know and understand what is comprehended under those two simple words, which are so remarkable when found in combination—‘righteous Father’.

    He is ‘righteous’, having the attributes of a judge and ruler, just and impartial, by no means sparing the guilty. He is ‘Father’, near of kin, loving, tender and forgiving. In his character and in his dealings with his people he blends the two as they were never combined before. How can a judge and a father be found in one? Where guilty men are concerned, how can both characters be carried out to the full? How is it possible? There is only one answer and that is found in the sacrifice of Jesus which has joined the two in one. In the atonement of our Lord Jesus ‘Mercy and truth are met together; righteousness and peace have kissed each other.’ In the sacred substitution we see declared how God is ‘righteous’ and yet ‘Father’: in the sublime transactions of Calvary he manifests all the love of a tender father’s heart and all the justice of an impartial ruler’s sword.

    FOR MEDITATION: Rejoice in some of the other combined attributes of ‘our Father in heaven’. He is ‘a just God and a Saviour’ (Isaiah 45:21), ‘just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus’ (Romans 3:26) and ‘faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness’ (1 John 1:9), if we confess to him our ungodliness and sinfulness.


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 298.
    14 OCTOBER (1877) The righteous Father known and loved ‘O righteous Father, the world hath not known thee: but I have known thee, and these have known that thou hast sent me. And I have declared unto them thy name, and will declare it: that the love wherewith thou hast loved me may be in them, and I in them.’ John 17:25–26 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: 1 John 2:23–3:1 In verse 25 there is a testing name given to God, by which we may decide whether we know the name of the Lord or not. It is this: ‘righteous Father’. I do not know that in any other portion of Scripture God is called by that name. In this prayer Jesus had not addressed the Father by that title before. He had spoken of him as ‘Father’ and also as ‘Holy Father’, but here alone it is—‘righteous Father’. I say that the knowledge of this name may serve as a test as to whether you do truly and spiritually know God, or have only a notional and outward idea of him. If you know him aright you know and understand what is comprehended under those two simple words, which are so remarkable when found in combination—‘righteous Father’. He is ‘righteous’, having the attributes of a judge and ruler, just and impartial, by no means sparing the guilty. He is ‘Father’, near of kin, loving, tender and forgiving. In his character and in his dealings with his people he blends the two as they were never combined before. How can a judge and a father be found in one? Where guilty men are concerned, how can both characters be carried out to the full? How is it possible? There is only one answer and that is found in the sacrifice of Jesus which has joined the two in one. In the atonement of our Lord Jesus ‘Mercy and truth are met together; righteousness and peace have kissed each other.’ In the sacred substitution we see declared how God is ‘righteous’ and yet ‘Father’: in the sublime transactions of Calvary he manifests all the love of a tender father’s heart and all the justice of an impartial ruler’s sword. FOR MEDITATION: Rejoice in some of the other combined attributes of ‘our Father in heaven’. He is ‘a just God and a Saviour’ (Isaiah 45:21), ‘just, and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus’ (Romans 3:26) and ‘faithful and just to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness’ (1 John 1:9), if we confess to him our ungodliness and sinfulness. C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 298.
    0 Comments 0 Shares
  • 27 SEPTEMBER (1874)

    Abundant pardon

    ‘He will abundantly pardon.’ Isaiah 55:7
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: 1 John 1:5–2:2

    That there is abundant pardon may be clearly seen from the fact that the substitute was not an angel, nor a creature of limited power and merit; but he who came to save us was none other than God himself, ‘very God of very God’. The fountain filled for us to wash in is not a fountain which can only cleanse a little and then will be exhausted of its virtues. The Son of God has filled it from his pierced heart, and the merit of the atoning blood is without limit. There was a limit to the purpose for which it was shed, for he ‘loved the church and gave himself for it’, but it is blasphemous to imagine that there is any boundary to the merit of the atonement itself. There is in the sacrifice of the Son of God a degree of power which seraphim cannot conceive. Were all the stars worlds, all filled with myriads of inhabitants who had revolted against God, if an atonement had been wanted for them all, it is not within my power to conceive that a greater atonement could be required for the whole host of creatures than that which Christ presented upon the cross. The boundless merit of it, therefore, makes us rejoice, for our God ‘will abundantly pardon’.

    Sinner, if there had been a little saviour, you might have despaired; if the Saviour had offered a small sacrifice, or if there had been a narrow degree of merit in his agonies and cries, I might have spoken to you with bated breath; but now I know that ‘he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him’, and, therefore, I am warranted to declare to you that our God in Christ Jesus ‘will abundantly pardon’. May God send these things home to the hearts of those who are labouring under a sense of guilt.

    FOR MEDITATION: (Our Own Hymn Book no.202 v.3—Samuel Davies, 1769)
    ‘In wonder lost, with trembling joy
    We take the pardon of our God;
    Pardon for crimes of deepest dye;
    A pardon bought with Jesus’ blood:
    Who is a pardoning God like Thee?
    Or who has grace so rich and free?’
    27 SEPTEMBER (1874) Abundant pardon ‘He will abundantly pardon.’ Isaiah 55:7 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: 1 John 1:5–2:2 That there is abundant pardon may be clearly seen from the fact that the substitute was not an angel, nor a creature of limited power and merit; but he who came to save us was none other than God himself, ‘very God of very God’. The fountain filled for us to wash in is not a fountain which can only cleanse a little and then will be exhausted of its virtues. The Son of God has filled it from his pierced heart, and the merit of the atoning blood is without limit. There was a limit to the purpose for which it was shed, for he ‘loved the church and gave himself for it’, but it is blasphemous to imagine that there is any boundary to the merit of the atonement itself. There is in the sacrifice of the Son of God a degree of power which seraphim cannot conceive. Were all the stars worlds, all filled with myriads of inhabitants who had revolted against God, if an atonement had been wanted for them all, it is not within my power to conceive that a greater atonement could be required for the whole host of creatures than that which Christ presented upon the cross. The boundless merit of it, therefore, makes us rejoice, for our God ‘will abundantly pardon’. Sinner, if there had been a little saviour, you might have despaired; if the Saviour had offered a small sacrifice, or if there had been a narrow degree of merit in his agonies and cries, I might have spoken to you with bated breath; but now I know that ‘he is able also to save them to the uttermost that come unto God by him’, and, therefore, I am warranted to declare to you that our God in Christ Jesus ‘will abundantly pardon’. May God send these things home to the hearts of those who are labouring under a sense of guilt. FOR MEDITATION: (Our Own Hymn Book no.202 v.3—Samuel Davies, 1769) ‘In wonder lost, with trembling joy We take the pardon of our God; Pardon for crimes of deepest dye; A pardon bought with Jesus’ blood: Who is a pardoning God like Thee? Or who has grace so rich and free?’
    0 Comments 0 Shares
More Results
Sponsored