15 NOVEMBER (1874)

The consecration of priests

‘This is the thing that thou shalt do unto them to hallow them, to minister unto me in the priest’s office.’ Exodus 29:1
SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Revelation 5:6–14

Under the law only one family could serve God in the priest’s office, but under the gospel all the saints are ‘a chosen generation, a royal priesthood’ (1 Peter 2:9). In the Christian church no persons whatsoever are set apart to the priesthood above the rest of their brethren, for in us is fulfilled the promise which Israel by reason of her sin failed to obtain—‘ye shall be unto me a kingdom of priests’.

Paul, in addressing all the saints, bids them present their ‘bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is’ their ‘reasonable service’. It is the grand design of all the works of divine grace, both for us and in us, to fit us for the office of the spiritual priesthood, and it will be the crown of our perfection when with all our brethren we shall sing unto the Lord Jesus the new song, ‘Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood, and hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever.’

This honour have all the saints: according to Peter (1 Peter 2:2–5) it belongs even to ‘newborn babes’ in grace, for even such are spoken of as forming part of ‘an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices’. Nor is this confined to men as was the Aaronic priesthood, for in Christ Jesus ‘there is neither male nor female’. It does not refer exclusively or even specially to persons called clergymen or ministers, but to all of you who believe in Jesus, for you are God’s clergy, that is, his inheritance, and you should all be ministers, ministering ‘according to the grace that is given to’ you.

FOR MEDITATION: All believers are expected to make living sacrifices to God (Romans 12:1). In Hebrews 13:15–16 we learn that these ongoing sacrifices should include our praises (Psalm 69:30–31), our prayers (Revelation 5:8), our practices (Micah 6:6–8) and our presents (Philippians 4:18).


C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 330.
15 NOVEMBER (1874) The consecration of priests ‘This is the thing that thou shalt do unto them to hallow them, to minister unto me in the priest’s office.’ Exodus 29:1 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Revelation 5:6–14 Under the law only one family could serve God in the priest’s office, but under the gospel all the saints are ‘a chosen generation, a royal priesthood’ (1 Peter 2:9). In the Christian church no persons whatsoever are set apart to the priesthood above the rest of their brethren, for in us is fulfilled the promise which Israel by reason of her sin failed to obtain—‘ye shall be unto me a kingdom of priests’. Paul, in addressing all the saints, bids them present their ‘bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is’ their ‘reasonable service’. It is the grand design of all the works of divine grace, both for us and in us, to fit us for the office of the spiritual priesthood, and it will be the crown of our perfection when with all our brethren we shall sing unto the Lord Jesus the new song, ‘Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood, and hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever.’ This honour have all the saints: according to Peter (1 Peter 2:2–5) it belongs even to ‘newborn babes’ in grace, for even such are spoken of as forming part of ‘an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices’. Nor is this confined to men as was the Aaronic priesthood, for in Christ Jesus ‘there is neither male nor female’. It does not refer exclusively or even specially to persons called clergymen or ministers, but to all of you who believe in Jesus, for you are God’s clergy, that is, his inheritance, and you should all be ministers, ministering ‘according to the grace that is given to’ you. FOR MEDITATION: All believers are expected to make living sacrifices to God (Romans 12:1). In Hebrews 13:15–16 we learn that these ongoing sacrifices should include our praises (Psalm 69:30–31), our prayers (Revelation 5:8), our practices (Micah 6:6–8) and our presents (Philippians 4:18). C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 330.
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