• 5 DECEMBER (UNDATED SERMON)

    A great bargain

    ‘Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto a merchant man, seeking goodly pearls: Who, when he had found one pearl of great price, went and sold all that he had, and bought it.’ Matthew 13:45–46

    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: 2 Corinthians 4:1–6

    A merchantman endeavours to trade so as to make a profit. Whether he deals in pearls or in grain, he does not hope to obtain riches by labour. He leaves that to those who eat their bread in the sweat of their face. He tries to get his by the sweat of his brain. He is dependent not so much upon labour as upon knowledge, skill and the advantage which superior acquaintance with the article in which he deals gives to him. Now, this merchantman is, at the very commencement, in some measure a picture of the seeker after Christ. Christ and his salvation are not to be earned; they are not to be procured as the result of labour. But Christ is to be had by knowledge. What does the Scripture say? ‘By his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many’, that is, through their knowing Christ they become justified.

    This is, indeed, another way of putting the system of salvation which is stated thus: ‘how shall they hear without a preacher?’ The work begins with hearing the preacher; then it goes on to believing what they hear, and through believing they are saved. This is virtually knowledge, the knowledge communicated by God’s messenger or by God’s word, the knowledge heard, the knowledge believed. So men come to the knowledge of him whom to know is life eternal, for when a man knows and understands Christ, so that he gives his heart to him, then is he saved. Inasmuch, then, as the merchantman seeks his advantage by superior knowledge, he becomes a type of the man who gets saved through obtaining ‘the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ’. In this parable we have a fit emblem of many who lay hold on Christ and find him to be their all in all.

    FOR MEDITATION: Knowledge plays a vital role in the salvation of the sinner. First must come ‘the knowledge of sin’ (Romans 3:20); then we are well prepared to receive ‘knowledge of salvation’ (Luke 1:77) and ‘the knowledge of the truth’ (1 Timothy 2:4). Sadly many go in for the wrong kind of learning and never reach this goal (2 Timothy 3:7). How much do you know of these things?


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 350.
    5 DECEMBER (UNDATED SERMON) A great bargain ‘Again, the kingdom of heaven is like unto a merchant man, seeking goodly pearls: Who, when he had found one pearl of great price, went and sold all that he had, and bought it.’ Matthew 13:45–46 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: 2 Corinthians 4:1–6 A merchantman endeavours to trade so as to make a profit. Whether he deals in pearls or in grain, he does not hope to obtain riches by labour. He leaves that to those who eat their bread in the sweat of their face. He tries to get his by the sweat of his brain. He is dependent not so much upon labour as upon knowledge, skill and the advantage which superior acquaintance with the article in which he deals gives to him. Now, this merchantman is, at the very commencement, in some measure a picture of the seeker after Christ. Christ and his salvation are not to be earned; they are not to be procured as the result of labour. But Christ is to be had by knowledge. What does the Scripture say? ‘By his knowledge shall my righteous servant justify many’, that is, through their knowing Christ they become justified. This is, indeed, another way of putting the system of salvation which is stated thus: ‘how shall they hear without a preacher?’ The work begins with hearing the preacher; then it goes on to believing what they hear, and through believing they are saved. This is virtually knowledge, the knowledge communicated by God’s messenger or by God’s word, the knowledge heard, the knowledge believed. So men come to the knowledge of him whom to know is life eternal, for when a man knows and understands Christ, so that he gives his heart to him, then is he saved. Inasmuch, then, as the merchantman seeks his advantage by superior knowledge, he becomes a type of the man who gets saved through obtaining ‘the knowledge of the glory of God in the face of Jesus Christ’. In this parable we have a fit emblem of many who lay hold on Christ and find him to be their all in all. FOR MEDITATION: Knowledge plays a vital role in the salvation of the sinner. First must come ‘the knowledge of sin’ (Romans 3:20); then we are well prepared to receive ‘knowledge of salvation’ (Luke 1:77) and ‘the knowledge of the truth’ (1 Timothy 2:4). Sadly many go in for the wrong kind of learning and never reach this goal (2 Timothy 3:7). How much do you know of these things? C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 350.
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  • 10 Predictions on How the Omicron Variant Will Be Used to Justify More Medically Induced Government Tyranny and Deaths

    When the Romans could not stop Christianity with persecution, the Roman State created a control method to corral its spread - Roman Catholicism.

    Join their State approved brand of worship and you can be free from continual attack from the State.

    Now, that resistance has stiffened to the kill/clot shot government's seeking control are creating a new religion of sorts, variant vaccine protection worship.

    Take their kill/clot shot and you will be protected or else locked down, maybe both.

    In the article below are 10 predictions of how the global tyrannists will use omicron and other variants to enact their authoritarian control and depopulation playbook into 2022 and beyond. https://bit.ly/3cWrP8m

    #covid #covid19 #covidvariants #omicron #omicronvariant #medicaltyranny
    10 Predictions on How the Omicron Variant Will Be Used to Justify More Medically Induced Government Tyranny and Deaths When the Romans could not stop Christianity with persecution, the Roman State created a control method to corral its spread - Roman Catholicism. Join their State approved brand of worship and you can be free from continual attack from the State. Now, that resistance has stiffened to the kill/clot shot government's seeking control are creating a new religion of sorts, variant vaccine protection worship. Take their kill/clot shot and you will be protected or else locked down, maybe both. In the article below are 10 predictions of how the global tyrannists will use omicron and other variants to enact their authoritarian control and depopulation playbook into 2022 and beyond. https://bit.ly/3cWrP8m #covid #covid19 #covidvariants #omicron #omicronvariant #medicaltyranny
    BIT.LY
    Ten OMICRON "variant" predictions for 2022 and beyond... globalist authoritarian playbook stripped naked
    The omicron "variant" media hysteria is pure fiction. It's nothing but a 1984-style Orwellian psychological terrorism operation that has been engineered to keep the populations of the world enslaved and obedient while terrorist governments carry out their global depopulation / genocid
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  • your #Bible Word for today -
    #Romans 12:9b #kjv
    Abhor that which is #evil; cleave to that which is good.
    Abhor = hate, dislike

    examples of evil: #fauci, gates, koch, soros, etc.
    your #Bible Word for today - #Romans 12:9b #kjv Abhor that which is #evil; cleave to that which is good. Abhor = hate, dislike examples of evil: #fauci, gates, koch, soros, etc.
    3
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  • 24 NOVEMBER (UNDATED SERMON)

    For the sick and afflicted

    ‘Surely it is meet to be said unto God, I have borne chastisement, I will not offend any more: that which I see not teach thou me: if I have done iniquity, I will do no more.’ Job 34:31–32
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Hebrews 12:1–4

    Do you find in the law that any sin is excused upon the ground that it is constitutional? Do you find anything in the example of Christ, or in the precepts of the gospel, to justify a man in saying, ‘I must be treated with indulgence, for my nature is so inclined to a certain sin that I cannot help yielding to it’? You must not talk such nonsense. Your first business is to conquer the sin you love best; against it all your efforts and all the grace you can get must be leveled. Jericho must be first besieged, for it is the strongest fort of the enemy, and until it is taken nothing can be done.

    I have generally noticed in conversion that the most complete change takes place in that very point in which the man was constitutionally most weak. God’s strength is made perfect in our weakness. ‘Well’, cries one, ‘suppose I have a besetting sin; how can I help it?’ I reply, if I knew that four fellows were going to beset me tonight on Clapham Common, I should take with me sufficient policemen to lock the fellows up. When a man knows that he has a besetting sin it is not for him to say, ‘It is a besetting sin and I cannot help it;’ he must, on the other hand, call for heavenly assistance against these besetments.

    If you have besetting sins and you know it, fight with them and overcome them by the blood of the Lamb. By faith in Jesus Christ besetting sins go to be led captive, and they must be led captive, for the child of God must overcome even to the end. We are to be ‘more than conquerors through him that loved us’. Let the love of God, then, lead you to search yourselves and say, ‘that which I see not teach thou me: if I have done iniquity, I will do no more.’

    FOR MEDITATION: The Christian’s attitude towards besetting sin should not be to continue in it (Romans 6:1–2), to be ruled by it (Romans 6:12–14), or to be a slave to it (Romans 6:16–17), but to lay it aside (Hebrews 12:1) and to strive against it (Hebrews 12:4).


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 339.
    24 NOVEMBER (UNDATED SERMON) For the sick and afflicted ‘Surely it is meet to be said unto God, I have borne chastisement, I will not offend any more: that which I see not teach thou me: if I have done iniquity, I will do no more.’ Job 34:31–32 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Hebrews 12:1–4 Do you find in the law that any sin is excused upon the ground that it is constitutional? Do you find anything in the example of Christ, or in the precepts of the gospel, to justify a man in saying, ‘I must be treated with indulgence, for my nature is so inclined to a certain sin that I cannot help yielding to it’? You must not talk such nonsense. Your first business is to conquer the sin you love best; against it all your efforts and all the grace you can get must be leveled. Jericho must be first besieged, for it is the strongest fort of the enemy, and until it is taken nothing can be done. I have generally noticed in conversion that the most complete change takes place in that very point in which the man was constitutionally most weak. God’s strength is made perfect in our weakness. ‘Well’, cries one, ‘suppose I have a besetting sin; how can I help it?’ I reply, if I knew that four fellows were going to beset me tonight on Clapham Common, I should take with me sufficient policemen to lock the fellows up. When a man knows that he has a besetting sin it is not for him to say, ‘It is a besetting sin and I cannot help it;’ he must, on the other hand, call for heavenly assistance against these besetments. If you have besetting sins and you know it, fight with them and overcome them by the blood of the Lamb. By faith in Jesus Christ besetting sins go to be led captive, and they must be led captive, for the child of God must overcome even to the end. We are to be ‘more than conquerors through him that loved us’. Let the love of God, then, lead you to search yourselves and say, ‘that which I see not teach thou me: if I have done iniquity, I will do no more.’ FOR MEDITATION: The Christian’s attitude towards besetting sin should not be to continue in it (Romans 6:1–2), to be ruled by it (Romans 6:12–14), or to be a slave to it (Romans 6:16–17), but to lay it aside (Hebrews 12:1) and to strive against it (Hebrews 12:4). C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 339.
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  • https://unitedwithisrael.org/11-year-old-finds-rare-coin-from-jewish-revolt-against-the-romans/?utm_source=newsletters_unitedwithisrael_org&utm_medium=email&utm_content=%27Victim%27+Turns+Out+to+be+Terrorist%3B+Rare+Discovery+Sheds+Light+on+Major+Jewish+Revolt%3B+Kids%27+TV+Host+Delivers+Outrageous+Message%3B+Arab+Member+of+Gov%27t+%27Condemns%27+Attack+-+in+Hebrew&utm_campaign=20211123_m165618344_%27Victim%27+Turns+Out+to+be+Terrorist%3B+Rare+Discovery+Sheds+Light+on+Major+Jewish+Revolt%3B+Kids%27+TV+Host+Delivers+Outrageous+Message%3B+Arab+Member+of+Gov%27t+%27Condemns%27+Attack+-+in+Hebrew&utm_term=11-Year-Old_27s+Rare+Discovery+Sheds+Light+on+Major+Jewish+Revolt
    https://unitedwithisrael.org/11-year-old-finds-rare-coin-from-jewish-revolt-against-the-romans/?utm_source=newsletters_unitedwithisrael_org&utm_medium=email&utm_content=%27Victim%27+Turns+Out+to+be+Terrorist%3B+Rare+Discovery+Sheds+Light+on+Major+Jewish+Revolt%3B+Kids%27+TV+Host+Delivers+Outrageous+Message%3B+Arab+Member+of+Gov%27t+%27Condemns%27+Attack+-+in+Hebrew&utm_campaign=20211123_m165618344_%27Victim%27+Turns+Out+to+be+Terrorist%3B+Rare+Discovery+Sheds+Light+on+Major+Jewish+Revolt%3B+Kids%27+TV+Host+Delivers+Outrageous+Message%3B+Arab+Member+of+Gov%27t+%27Condemns%27+Attack+-+in+Hebrew&utm_term=11-Year-Old_27s+Rare+Discovery+Sheds+Light+on+Major+Jewish+Revolt
    1
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  • 20 NOVEMBER (UNDATED SERMON)

    The stern pedagogue

    ‘Wherefore the law was our schoolmaster to bring us unto Christ, that we might be justified by faith. But after that faith is come, we are no longer under a schoolmaster.’ Galatians 3:24–25
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Romans 3:9–20

    Many transgressors argue, ‘I have not done worse than other people,’ to which the law replies, ‘What have you to do with other people? Each individual must stand or fall on his account before the law. The law is to you. If another has broken it, he shall be punished even as you shall, inasmuch as you have broken it.’ Then the man cries, ‘But I have been better than others.’ But the law says, ‘If you have not walked perfectly in all the ways of the Lord your God to do them, I have nothing to do with comparing you with others: for this is my sentence, “Cursed is every one that continueth not in all things which are written in the book of the law to do them.” ’

    Now, these are not my words, but the words of God by his servant Moses, and there they stand like a flaming sword, turning every way and blocking up the legal road to the tree of life. Conscience, when it is really awakened by the law, confesses herself condemned and ceases to uphold her plea of innocence. How can it be otherwise when the law is so stern?

    Then perhaps the man will say, ‘I mean to do better in the future,’ to which the law replies, ‘What have I to do with that? It is already due that you should be perfect in the future, and if you should be perfect, in what way would that wipe out your old offences? You will only have done what you ought to have done.’ But the man cries, ‘I do repent of having done wrong.’ ‘Yes,’ says the law, ‘but I have nothing to do with repentance.’ There is no provision in the ten commandments for repentance. Cursed is the man that breaks the law; and that is all that the law has to say to him.

    FOR MEDITATION: (Our Own Hymn Book no.647 v.2—William Cowper, 1779)
    ‘How long beneath the law I lay
    In bondage and distress!
    I toiled the precept to obey,
    But toiled without success.’


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 335.
    20 NOVEMBER (UNDATED SERMON) The stern pedagogue ‘Wherefore the law was our schoolmaster to bring us unto Christ, that we might be justified by faith. But after that faith is come, we are no longer under a schoolmaster.’ Galatians 3:24–25 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Romans 3:9–20 Many transgressors argue, ‘I have not done worse than other people,’ to which the law replies, ‘What have you to do with other people? Each individual must stand or fall on his account before the law. The law is to you. If another has broken it, he shall be punished even as you shall, inasmuch as you have broken it.’ Then the man cries, ‘But I have been better than others.’ But the law says, ‘If you have not walked perfectly in all the ways of the Lord your God to do them, I have nothing to do with comparing you with others: for this is my sentence, “Cursed is every one that continueth not in all things which are written in the book of the law to do them.” ’ Now, these are not my words, but the words of God by his servant Moses, and there they stand like a flaming sword, turning every way and blocking up the legal road to the tree of life. Conscience, when it is really awakened by the law, confesses herself condemned and ceases to uphold her plea of innocence. How can it be otherwise when the law is so stern? Then perhaps the man will say, ‘I mean to do better in the future,’ to which the law replies, ‘What have I to do with that? It is already due that you should be perfect in the future, and if you should be perfect, in what way would that wipe out your old offences? You will only have done what you ought to have done.’ But the man cries, ‘I do repent of having done wrong.’ ‘Yes,’ says the law, ‘but I have nothing to do with repentance.’ There is no provision in the ten commandments for repentance. Cursed is the man that breaks the law; and that is all that the law has to say to him. FOR MEDITATION: (Our Own Hymn Book no.647 v.2—William Cowper, 1779) ‘How long beneath the law I lay In bondage and distress! I toiled the precept to obey, But toiled without success.’ C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 335.
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  • 19 NOVEMBER (1876)

    Christ the end of the law

    ‘For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth.’ Romans 10:4
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Galatians 3:23–4:7

    ‘Christ is the end of the law’ in the sense that he is the termination of it. His people are not under it as a covenant of life. We ‘are not under the law, but under grace’. The old covenant as it stood with father Adam was, ‘This do and thou shalt live’; its command he did not keep and consequently he did not live, nor do we live in him, since in Adam all died. The old covenant was broken and we became condemned thereby, but now, having suffered death in Christ, we are no more under it, but are dead to it.

    Brethren, at this present moment, although we rejoice to do good works, we are not seeking life through them; we are not hoping to obtain divine favour by our own goodness, nor even to keep ourselves in the love of God by any merit of our own. Chosen, not for our works, but according to the eternal will and good pleasure of God, and called, not of works, but by the Spirit of God, we desire to continue in this grace and return no more to the bondage of the old covenant. Since we have put our trust in an atonement provided and applied by grace through Jesus Christ, we are no longer slaves but children, not working to be saved, but saved already and working because we are saved. Neither that which we do, nor even that which the Spirit of God works in us, is to us the ground and basis of the love of God toward us, since he loved us from the first, because he would love us, unworthy though we were; and he loves us still in Christ and looks upon us not as we are in ourselves, but as we are in him, washed in his blood and covered in his righteousness; ‘ye are not under the law’.

    FOR MEDITATION: (Our Own Hymn Book no.647 v.4—William Cowper, 1779)
    ‘Then all my servile works were done
    A righteousness to raise;
    Now, freely chosen in the Son,
    I freely choose His ways.’


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 334.
    19 NOVEMBER (1876) Christ the end of the law ‘For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth.’ Romans 10:4 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Galatians 3:23–4:7 ‘Christ is the end of the law’ in the sense that he is the termination of it. His people are not under it as a covenant of life. We ‘are not under the law, but under grace’. The old covenant as it stood with father Adam was, ‘This do and thou shalt live’; its command he did not keep and consequently he did not live, nor do we live in him, since in Adam all died. The old covenant was broken and we became condemned thereby, but now, having suffered death in Christ, we are no more under it, but are dead to it. Brethren, at this present moment, although we rejoice to do good works, we are not seeking life through them; we are not hoping to obtain divine favour by our own goodness, nor even to keep ourselves in the love of God by any merit of our own. Chosen, not for our works, but according to the eternal will and good pleasure of God, and called, not of works, but by the Spirit of God, we desire to continue in this grace and return no more to the bondage of the old covenant. Since we have put our trust in an atonement provided and applied by grace through Jesus Christ, we are no longer slaves but children, not working to be saved, but saved already and working because we are saved. Neither that which we do, nor even that which the Spirit of God works in us, is to us the ground and basis of the love of God toward us, since he loved us from the first, because he would love us, unworthy though we were; and he loves us still in Christ and looks upon us not as we are in ourselves, but as we are in him, washed in his blood and covered in his righteousness; ‘ye are not under the law’. FOR MEDITATION: (Our Own Hymn Book no.647 v.4—William Cowper, 1779) ‘Then all my servile works were done A righteousness to raise; Now, freely chosen in the Son, I freely choose His ways.’ C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 334.
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  • 18 NOVEMBER (1877)

    Jesus interceding for transgressors

    ‘And made intercession for the transgressors.’ Isaiah 53:12
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: 1 Timothy 2:1–8

    If Christ appears in heaven for us, let us be glad to appear on earth for him. He owns us before God and the holy angels; let us not be ashamed to confess him before men and devils. If Christ pleads with God for men, let us not be backward to plead with men for God. If he by his intercession saves us to the uttermost, let us hasten to serve him to the uttermost. If he spends eternity in intercession for us, let us spend our time in intercession for his cause. If he thinks of us, we ought also to think of his people and especially supplicate for his afflicted. If he watches our cases and adapts his prayers to our necessities, let us observe the needs of his people and plead for them with understanding.

    Alas, how soon do men weary of pleading for the Lord. If a whole day is set apart for prayer and the meeting is not carefully managed, it readily becomes a weariness of the flesh. Prayer-meetings very easily lose their flame and burn low. Shame on these laggard spirits and this heavy flesh of ours, which needs to be pampered with liveliness and brevity, or we go to sleep at our devotions. Forever is not too long for him to plead, and yet an hour tries us here. On and on and on through all the ages, still his intercession rises to the throne, and yet we flag and our prayers are half dead in a short season.

    See, Moses lets his hands hang down, and Amalek is defeating Joshua in the plain! Can we endure to be thus losing victories and causing the enemy to triumph? If your ministers are unsuccessful, if your labourers for Christ in foreign lands make little headway, and if the work of Christ drags, is it not because in the secret place of intercession we have but little strength? The restraining of prayer is the weakening of the church.

    FOR MEDITATION: Although we are unable to match the everlasting nature of Christ’s intercession for us (Hebrews 7:25), our intercessions on behalf of others are supposed to be wide-ranging (1 Timothy 2:1–2). Giving up is not an option, because the Holy Spirit is ever-present to help us in our weakness (Romans 8:26–27).


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 333.
    18 NOVEMBER (1877) Jesus interceding for transgressors ‘And made intercession for the transgressors.’ Isaiah 53:12 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: 1 Timothy 2:1–8 If Christ appears in heaven for us, let us be glad to appear on earth for him. He owns us before God and the holy angels; let us not be ashamed to confess him before men and devils. If Christ pleads with God for men, let us not be backward to plead with men for God. If he by his intercession saves us to the uttermost, let us hasten to serve him to the uttermost. If he spends eternity in intercession for us, let us spend our time in intercession for his cause. If he thinks of us, we ought also to think of his people and especially supplicate for his afflicted. If he watches our cases and adapts his prayers to our necessities, let us observe the needs of his people and plead for them with understanding. Alas, how soon do men weary of pleading for the Lord. If a whole day is set apart for prayer and the meeting is not carefully managed, it readily becomes a weariness of the flesh. Prayer-meetings very easily lose their flame and burn low. Shame on these laggard spirits and this heavy flesh of ours, which needs to be pampered with liveliness and brevity, or we go to sleep at our devotions. Forever is not too long for him to plead, and yet an hour tries us here. On and on and on through all the ages, still his intercession rises to the throne, and yet we flag and our prayers are half dead in a short season. See, Moses lets his hands hang down, and Amalek is defeating Joshua in the plain! Can we endure to be thus losing victories and causing the enemy to triumph? If your ministers are unsuccessful, if your labourers for Christ in foreign lands make little headway, and if the work of Christ drags, is it not because in the secret place of intercession we have but little strength? The restraining of prayer is the weakening of the church. FOR MEDITATION: Although we are unable to match the everlasting nature of Christ’s intercession for us (Hebrews 7:25), our intercessions on behalf of others are supposed to be wide-ranging (1 Timothy 2:1–2). Giving up is not an option, because the Holy Spirit is ever-present to help us in our weakness (Romans 8:26–27). C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 333.
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  • 17 NOVEMBER (UNDATED SERMON)

    Our Lord’s humanity a sweet source of comfort

    ‘Then there came again and touched me one like the appearance of a man, and he strengthened me.’ Daniel 10:18
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Hebrews 9:15–28

    Do you feel yourselves guilty before God? Do you wish for mercy? Come, then, and come directly, for Jesus Christ, a man like yourselves, invites you. Remember, you cannot go to God without a mediator, but you may go to Christ without one: you may go just as you are. You need no introduction to Jesus. I know that you can go and tell another man like yourself your sin, for some are so foolish as to do so. They confess their sins to the priests, like Judas did, but you know Judas then went and hanged himself, which was a very likely thing to do after such a confession. But if you will go and tell your sins to Jesus, who is a man and something more than a man, he will hear your story, and it will not pollute his ear. He will listen to it and do more; he will absolve you effectually.

    Have you not felt, now that you have grown up, that you wished you were boys again, so that you could go at night and tell mother all that you had done wrong during the day, so that mother might kiss you and you would go to bed feeling that everything was right again? Well, there is no mortal to whom you can go for such forgiveness now, but the Lord Jesus Christ will be to you all that your mother was to you when you were a child. Go and tell him all about it, and ask him to wash you in his blood and cover you with his righteousness, and he will forgive you as freely as your own kind mother would have done.

    Jesus Christ will feel for you, for he knows all your temptations and weaknesses. If there is any sort of excuse to be made for you, he will make it: he did that for his murderers when he said, ‘Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.’ For that which cannot be mitigated at all he has something a great deal better than an excuse, namely his own atoning sacrifice.

    FOR MEDITATION: By virtue of his atoning sacrifice upon the cross the Lord Jesus Christ is fully equipped and qualified to act as our intercessor (Romans 8:34; Hebrews 7:25–27), mediator (1 Timothy 2:5–6; Hebrews 9:14–15; 12:24) and advocate with the Father (1 John 1:7–2:1). He does not require the assistance of human priestly ‘confessors’.


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 332.
    17 NOVEMBER (UNDATED SERMON) Our Lord’s humanity a sweet source of comfort ‘Then there came again and touched me one like the appearance of a man, and he strengthened me.’ Daniel 10:18 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Hebrews 9:15–28 Do you feel yourselves guilty before God? Do you wish for mercy? Come, then, and come directly, for Jesus Christ, a man like yourselves, invites you. Remember, you cannot go to God without a mediator, but you may go to Christ without one: you may go just as you are. You need no introduction to Jesus. I know that you can go and tell another man like yourself your sin, for some are so foolish as to do so. They confess their sins to the priests, like Judas did, but you know Judas then went and hanged himself, which was a very likely thing to do after such a confession. But if you will go and tell your sins to Jesus, who is a man and something more than a man, he will hear your story, and it will not pollute his ear. He will listen to it and do more; he will absolve you effectually. Have you not felt, now that you have grown up, that you wished you were boys again, so that you could go at night and tell mother all that you had done wrong during the day, so that mother might kiss you and you would go to bed feeling that everything was right again? Well, there is no mortal to whom you can go for such forgiveness now, but the Lord Jesus Christ will be to you all that your mother was to you when you were a child. Go and tell him all about it, and ask him to wash you in his blood and cover you with his righteousness, and he will forgive you as freely as your own kind mother would have done. Jesus Christ will feel for you, for he knows all your temptations and weaknesses. If there is any sort of excuse to be made for you, he will make it: he did that for his murderers when he said, ‘Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do.’ For that which cannot be mitigated at all he has something a great deal better than an excuse, namely his own atoning sacrifice. FOR MEDITATION: By virtue of his atoning sacrifice upon the cross the Lord Jesus Christ is fully equipped and qualified to act as our intercessor (Romans 8:34; Hebrews 7:25–27), mediator (1 Timothy 2:5–6; Hebrews 9:14–15; 12:24) and advocate with the Father (1 John 1:7–2:1). He does not require the assistance of human priestly ‘confessors’. C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 332.
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  • 15 NOVEMBER (1874)

    The consecration of priests

    ‘This is the thing that thou shalt do unto them to hallow them, to minister unto me in the priest’s office.’ Exodus 29:1
    SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Revelation 5:6–14

    Under the law only one family could serve God in the priest’s office, but under the gospel all the saints are ‘a chosen generation, a royal priesthood’ (1 Peter 2:9). In the Christian church no persons whatsoever are set apart to the priesthood above the rest of their brethren, for in us is fulfilled the promise which Israel by reason of her sin failed to obtain—‘ye shall be unto me a kingdom of priests’.

    Paul, in addressing all the saints, bids them present their ‘bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is’ their ‘reasonable service’. It is the grand design of all the works of divine grace, both for us and in us, to fit us for the office of the spiritual priesthood, and it will be the crown of our perfection when with all our brethren we shall sing unto the Lord Jesus the new song, ‘Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood, and hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever.’

    This honour have all the saints: according to Peter (1 Peter 2:2–5) it belongs even to ‘newborn babes’ in grace, for even such are spoken of as forming part of ‘an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices’. Nor is this confined to men as was the Aaronic priesthood, for in Christ Jesus ‘there is neither male nor female’. It does not refer exclusively or even specially to persons called clergymen or ministers, but to all of you who believe in Jesus, for you are God’s clergy, that is, his inheritance, and you should all be ministers, ministering ‘according to the grace that is given to’ you.

    FOR MEDITATION: All believers are expected to make living sacrifices to God (Romans 12:1). In Hebrews 13:15–16 we learn that these ongoing sacrifices should include our praises (Psalm 69:30–31), our prayers (Revelation 5:8), our practices (Micah 6:6–8) and our presents (Philippians 4:18).


    C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 330.
    15 NOVEMBER (1874) The consecration of priests ‘This is the thing that thou shalt do unto them to hallow them, to minister unto me in the priest’s office.’ Exodus 29:1 SUGGESTED FURTHER READING: Revelation 5:6–14 Under the law only one family could serve God in the priest’s office, but under the gospel all the saints are ‘a chosen generation, a royal priesthood’ (1 Peter 2:9). In the Christian church no persons whatsoever are set apart to the priesthood above the rest of their brethren, for in us is fulfilled the promise which Israel by reason of her sin failed to obtain—‘ye shall be unto me a kingdom of priests’. Paul, in addressing all the saints, bids them present their ‘bodies a living sacrifice, holy, acceptable unto God, which is’ their ‘reasonable service’. It is the grand design of all the works of divine grace, both for us and in us, to fit us for the office of the spiritual priesthood, and it will be the crown of our perfection when with all our brethren we shall sing unto the Lord Jesus the new song, ‘Unto him that loved us, and washed us from our sins in his own blood, and hath made us kings and priests unto God and his Father; to him be glory and dominion for ever and ever.’ This honour have all the saints: according to Peter (1 Peter 2:2–5) it belongs even to ‘newborn babes’ in grace, for even such are spoken of as forming part of ‘an holy priesthood, to offer up spiritual sacrifices’. Nor is this confined to men as was the Aaronic priesthood, for in Christ Jesus ‘there is neither male nor female’. It does not refer exclusively or even specially to persons called clergymen or ministers, but to all of you who believe in Jesus, for you are God’s clergy, that is, his inheritance, and you should all be ministers, ministering ‘according to the grace that is given to’ you. FOR MEDITATION: All believers are expected to make living sacrifices to God (Romans 12:1). In Hebrews 13:15–16 we learn that these ongoing sacrifices should include our praises (Psalm 69:30–31), our prayers (Revelation 5:8), our practices (Micah 6:6–8) and our presents (Philippians 4:18). C. H. Spurgeon and Terence Peter Crosby, 365 Days with Spurgeon (Volume 4), (Leominster, UK: Day One Publications, 2007), 330.
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